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San Miguel Island; April 11-18, 2017
Topic Started: Apr 19 2017, 02:19 PM (339 Views)
IWS Crew
Advanced Member
Greetings again from San Miguel Island! It was a productive week. I visited all the peregrine falcon territories and some areas in between. Five peregrine falcon pairs are now incubating. Next time Iím here, I expect to see some chicks!

Here are some photos and videos from the week:


The Hoffman nest is hidden behind some still blooming coreopsis. The adults are completely hidden inside when they are incubating. I only get to see them when they are entering or leaving the nest. I captured a quick photo of the female at the nest entrance.


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The Hoffman male was perched above the nest while the female incubated.


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The Science birds were not incubating when I visited this week, but a pair spent time in and close to the nest and copulated, so Iím hopeful they will be incubating next time I visit. The female in the photo below is quite light in color, more brown than gray. I'm thinking this might be a new, younger female as I did not note the female being so brown the last time I visited (adults are usually more gray with a black mask, whereas this bird has more brown coloration on the body and head, typical of a second-year bird).


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There are no peregrines nesting at the historic Cardwell Point territory; however, I often see a peregrine or two cruising through the area whenever I visit, including the young peregrine in the photo below. Cardwell has a nice long, wide, sandy beach which makes it a popular spot for foraging peregrines.



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I spent one afternoon searching for peregrines (and eagles!) along a section of the southwest coast of San Miguel Island between the Science and Crook Point territories. Lots of little nooks and crannies in there. I did see a few peregrines, but I think one was a Science bird and one was a Crook bird. No new territories were found.


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A group from the Santa Barbara Botanical Garden visited the island one afternoon during the week to do some botanizing. Hereís a photo of the plane that flew them out to the island parked close to the ranger station (where I stay when I'm on the island) and a short video of it taking off on a typical, windy afternoon.



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http://vid111.photobucket.com/albums/n133/...zpsckvj2vdn.mp4



While observing the Prince Island peregrines, a pair of black oystercatchers were foraging for mussels in front of me and I captured a video of one plucking a mussel off of a rock and flying off with it.

http://vid111.photobucket.com/albums/n133/...zpsqylosk8z.mp4



As a reminder, the IWS Nest Adoption Challenge is now on! Contribute at:http://www.iws.org/support.html

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klemon
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Advanced Member
Hope new peregrines are welcome. lol Beautiful Pictures and videos. Thanks for all IWS and crew do.





Kathy
Southern Illinois <3
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PearlBailey
Advanced Member
It sounds like a peregrine haven out there on San Miguel! Thanks so much for taking us along with some wonderful photos and vids.

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