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San Miguel Island; May 9-16, 2017
Topic Started: May 16 2017, 04:08 PM (492 Views)
IWS Crew
Advanced Member
As expected, more peregrine falcon chicks have hatched on San Miguel Island! There are four nests with chicks and one nest is still incubating.

I caught a brief glimpse of one nestling in the Bat Rock nest, but for the most part, the female kept it covered. It was quite small, so there’s a chance there are additional eggs in the nest still to hatch.

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The Bat Rock male flew to the nest (he’s on the left) while the female continued to brood the chick. She was vocalizing quite a bit, perhaps hinting to her mate that the next time he comes to the nest he better bring food!

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At Carbon, I was able to confirm at least two chicks in there while the female was feeding them. The chicks are still pretty small and were still being brooded.

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There are at least three chicks at the Crook Point nest. These are a little bit older than the Carbon chicks and no longer need to be brooded all the time. The female was perched close by though, keeping a watchful eye on her youngsters. The chicks are the white balls of fluff at the edge of the nest entrance.

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There’s something interesting happening at the Hoffman nest; there are three adults in attendance – two females and a male. The Hoffman nest is another one I cannot see into, but, based on the adults’ behaviors, including some food deliveries to the nest, I think there are chicks in there. There was an adult in the nest at all times while I visited, so I think the chicks are small and still being brooded.

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Hoffman male

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One of the females is in the nest entrance (the white spot in the dark cave a little to the left and below the center of the photo) while the other one is perched in a little pocket in the cliffs (the other white spot above and to the right of the center of the photo).


There are a few territories where I’ve been seeing peregrines, but these pairs are not nesting. Science is one of these territories. The adults have been visiting a particular crevice in the cliffs that looks like a good nesting spot, but no sign of incubation. Perhaps this location will be used next season.

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There were a couple of calm days before gale force winds kicked up again, so I spent one of those calm days surveying the west end of the island. Other researchers have reported seeing sea otters in the kelp beds off Point Bennett and I’ve looked for them several times over the past few years but had never found them, until this week! I set up my spotting scope and scanned the kelp beds. As I scanned, two blobs appeared that just looked a little different. I kept the scope on them and after a little while I saw faces and paws and flipper-like hind feet and the two otters interacting with one another. Finally, I saw sea otters off San Miguel Island! The photo is not great, but, trust me, there are two sea otters there.

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The otters were in the kelp bed to the right of the island (Point Bennett – the westernmost point of the island) in the photo below.

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I’ll sign off with a photo of a group of California sea lions on the beach at Cardwell Point.

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klemon
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Everything was absolutely beautiful. Thanks for all ya'll do.




Kathy
Southern Illinois
<3 :^: :flying:
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PearlBailey
Advanced Member
My, my, my! What good Peregrine spotting eyes you have! :D Thanks for the update!
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firstview06
Advanced Member
And those same eyes spotted the otters. I had no idea they have recovered that far south! Bad for abalone but great news about otters.

Kathleen
Western Colorado
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sunnyland7
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IWS Crew
Seems the peregrines and otters doing well /
How busy you all are/
Hope our eagles keep doing well /
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torreycat
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Glad there's such good peregrine habitat there ... as well as for sea otters & sea lions ... but makes me wonder if it's less hospitable to eagles? I'm not familiar with the topography, perhaps just fewer trees or other appropriate nesting sites -- or too many peregrines for eagles to be comfortable there? Perhaps A56 will show the way some day! :<<o>>:
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