Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]
Welcome to Da Wrestling Board. We hope you enjoy your visit.


You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.


Join our community!


If you're already a member please log in to your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
WWF Flashback: April 1993
Topic Started: May 24 2018, 10:11 PM (138 Views)
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF APRIL 1993


- Last time on the WWF Flashback… The World’s Largest Toga Party draws near, as WrestleMania IX is scheduled for the first weekend of April. The return of Hulk Hogan means we get our second consecutive WrestleMania with a “Double Main Event” billing, as Hogan joins Brutus Beefcake to form the Mega-Maniacs, and they’ll challenge Money Inc. for the Tag Team Titles… Bret Hart’s latest “get him over as a fighting Champion” is to push he fights for respect, complete with a music video set to Aretha Franklin’s “Respect”… Jim Duggan isn’t going to stay down and lick his wounds, and vows to avenge himself and his country against Yokozuna… High Energy quietly split up, and Koko B. Ware wouldn’t be seen for another year. Joining him on the “Leaving WWF” Tour is Barry “Repo Man” Darsow and Steve “Skinner” Keirn… Bobby Heenan and Gorilla Monsoon called their last show together, the March 28th episode of Wrestling Challenge… Andre The Giant became the inaugural inductee into the fabled WWE Hall of Fame… Vince McMahon was presented with the Michael Landon Award of Honor by Hulk Hogan


- Vince McMahon, Randy Savage, and Jerry Lawler host the April 3rd episode of Superstars from Caesar’s Palace. Between matches taped on March 7th ‘(mostly enhancement matches), we get new interviews with participants for WrestleMania IX. “The Narcissist” Lex Luger is by the reflection pool and uses that as material for his promo on Mr. Perfect. Shawn Michaels is hanging by at the pool, and the camera gets an unnecessary shot from a low angle to showcase him in a speedo. I guess if anyone cries sexism with the camera work, we can show them that clip. The Giant Gonzales and Harvey Wippleman join the hosts from inside the Casino. Finally, they interview Bret Hart in front of one of the fountains.


- Virgil vs. The Giant Gonzales – From the April 3rd episode of Superstars, taped on March 8th from North Charleston, SC… with Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan calling the action? I WAS LIED TO! We get a shot of some geek in awe of Gonzales. He probably never saw one second of WCW television between the Summer of ’90 through Winter of ’91-92. Virgil does his best to avoid being cornered. Gonzales grabs him by the throat and tosses him into the turnbuckle. Virgil climbs the ropes and locks up for a test-of-strength. Is this legal, man? “Only here and Mississippi.” Gonzales pulls Virgil off the top rope and clubs him across the back with a forearm. Virgil slides between the legs and hits Gonzales with a dropkick. Gonzales swipes away his second attempt, lays him out with a clothesline, and finishes with the Choke-Slam at 2:58. Not a bad showcase for Gonzales. Post-match, he plants Virgil with a second Choke-Slam. Monsoon implores referee Bill Alfonso to do something, even if it’s wrong.


- Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan host the April 4th episode of Wrestling Challenge from Caesar’s Palace (all matches are commentated on by the Superstars crew for whatever reason). They interview Yokozuna and Mr. Fuji inside the Casino (with Heenan trying to swindle his way out of paying for merchandise). Next up is an interview with Bret Hart from outside the entrance of Caesar’s Palace. Mr. Perfect is interviewed in front of one of the many fountains. The Giant Gonzales and Harvey Wippleman show up outside of one of the nice eateries at the Palace. Shawn Michaels cuts the same promo in the same gear from the day before, this time inside his suite. We get a sneak peak at “Caesar and Cleopatra” as Heenan and Monsoon argue over predictions for the Tag Team Title Match.


- From the April 4th episode of Wrestling Challenge, “Mean” Gene Okerlund is standing by with The Mega-Maniacs. Hogan says when you say your prayers, train, take your vitamins, believe in yourself, and in Hulk Hogan, you believe in the youth of America, He then incorrectly used the “doing a 360” phrase to prove his point. Jimmy Hart says they’re going to win the titles and go on a World Tour. Beefcake (wearing the ridiculous mask) says the Harley Davidsons are prepped for their new trophies. He also suggests they feed Money Inc. to the lions because of the old phrase “when in Rome, do as the Romans do.” Hogan says they’ve put the mask through the stress-test and bops him with the briefcase to show how strong it is. Maybe it didn’t hurt, but it adjusted it. These promos from Hogan and Beefcake have been some of the worst in the build to WrestleMania IX.


- Bob Backlund vs. Doink (the Clown) – From the April 4th episode of All-American Wrestling, taped on March 7th from Fayetteville, NC. Sean Mooney and Lord Alfred Hayes are calling the action. Doink has given his wig an interesting makeover. They keep pushing Backlund is making his first WrestleMania appearance. He offers a handshake but Doink won’t accept and mocks Backlund’s mannerisms. Doink picks the leg and Backlund takes him over with a monkey flip. Backlund picks the leg with ease and punks Doink out. Doink blocks a roll-up attempt and stomps across the throat. He connects with a swinging neck breaker and mounts Backlund with a reverse body scissor. We come back from commercial with Doink working Backlund over on the floor. Back inside, Doink with a slam. He goes to the top rope and meets a boot on the way down. Backlund jerks the head of Doink between his knees and rakes the eyes with the bottom of his boot. He goes for the legs and sends him into the corner with a slingshot. He sends him to the opposite corner, the same one where Doink’s jacket rests. He digs into the pocket, grabs an umbrella, and shatters the handle across the back of Backlund’s head, drawing a DQ at 5:02 and howling laughter from Lord Alfred. Doink was way ahead of his time. This would be the last time we would hear Sean Mooney call a WWF match. *1/2


- Virgil vs. Bam Bam Bigelow – From the April 5th episode of Monday Night Raw, taped on March 22nd from the Manhattan Center. The running joke for the show is that Rob Bartlett went bust and is stuck in Las Vegas. Good. Virgil grabs a wristlock and comes off the ropes with a dropkick. Mild “Virgil Sucks” chant. These Manhattan Center crowds hate him, don’t they? Bigelow misses a headbutt and gets rolled up for two. Virgil goes for a crucifix cradles and eats a Samoan drop for being so foolish. Bigelow with a snap mare into a chin-lock. He transitions into an abdominal stretch, then back to the chin-lock. Oh man, we’ve got a BEAR-HUG next. Unlike guys like Blake Beverly, Bigelow looks like he should be using the hold. He meets a boot charging into the corner and Virgil lays him out with a second-rope clothesline. Virgil with a missile dropkick for two. He peppers Bigelow with jabs and hits him with an axe-handle. Bam Bam side-steps a blind cross body, levels Virgil with a clothesline, and finishes with the flying headbutt at 7:00. Mostly uninspired stuff. *


- We get an exclusive interview taped from the WrestleMania IX set. “Mean” Gene Okerlund is standing by with Mr. Fuji and Yokozuna. Okerlund lets us know that Fuji is filing a formal protest to President Jack Tunney on behalf of Yokozuna claiming he should still be the WWF Champion. They claim there was no official contract between Hulk Hogan and Yokozuna, and the match wasn’t sanctioned. Oh, Gene Okerlund SAID EVERY SINGLE WORD. NOT ONE CAME FROM FUJI. All Yokozuna added as “Banzai” as he angrily disrobed.


- Bob Backlund vs. Kim-Chee – From the April 5th episode of Raw. I thought the Night After Mania was supposed to be special! Backlund offers the handshake, and as expected, it’s not accepted. Backlund avoids a clothesline, takes Kim-Chee over with a hip toss, and sweeps the leg. Kim-Chee with a cheap shot from the outside, followed by a pair of slams. Backlund’s roll-up attempt is met with an elbow to the side of the head. Kim-Chee slams Backlund face-first into the canvas for two. Backlund counters a chin-lock with a back suplex. Kim-Chee pops up first and misses an elbow drop. Backlund with a hip toss and slam. Whip to the ropes and Backlund traps the legs in a pinning combination for three at 3:59. Steve Lombardi’s last televised match under the Kim-Chee mask, but he has one more appearance tucked away. ½*


- Jim Brunzell vs. Damien Demento – From the April 5th episode of Raw. We’re getting all the top-level talent, aren’t we? Brunzell comes out to “Crank It Up”. Rob Bartlett calls into the show to let everyone know he’s stuck in Las Vegas. They start by fighting over a hammer-lock as Vince ignores Bartlett’s pleading for money to get back to New York. To be fair, these were lean years for McMahon’s bank account. Brunzell with a surprise small package for two. Whip to the ropes and a sunset flip for two. Demento blocks a hip toss and hits a forearm to the chest. McMahon has the nerve to say last night show was the greatest WrestleMania ever. I know he must sell it, but damn if that isn’t way off base. Demento with a pair of elbows for two. Brunzell comes back with an atomic drop and ear smack. Whip to the ropes and the dropkick gets two. Demento with a boot to the midsection, hangman’s neck breaker, and loaded knee drop for three at 5:05. Jim Brunzell’s final televised appearance for the WWF. ¼*


- The Steiner Brothers vs. The Beverly Brothers – From the April 5th episode of Monday Night Raw. It’s a Royal Rumble Rematch™! Scott starts with Beau and quickly goes to work on him. Beau complains about a hair-pull. He blocks a suplex and yanks Scott down by the hair. Scott responds with the double under-hook suplex (which Savage pronounces as if he were Gordon Solie). Rick and Blake in now. Blake takes Rick over with a power-slam, and Rick comes right back with his own. Scott with an overhead belly-to-belly suplex. Whip to the ropes and a cheap shot from Beau turns the tide. Beau comes off the top with a double axe-handle and connects with a back breaker for two. We come back from commercial with Beau in control with a chin-lock. More double teaming in the corner. Scott takes Blake over with a suplex. Beau misses a leg drops and gets planted with a tilt-o-whirl power-slam. Rick with the hot tag, running wild on both Beverly’s. We get heel miscommunication, and the Franken-Steiner finishes Blake at 8:53. A bit below the level of the match they had at the Rumble, otherwise fine. **1/4


- Jerry “The King” Lawler vs. Jim Powers – From the April 5th episode of Monday Night Raw, and Lawler’s TV in-ring debut. They did a show-long gimmick where Lawler’s match kept being postponed because he didn’t appreciate the jeers from the crowd. Powers, no doubt pissed that Brunzell stole his music, attacks Lawler to finally get the match started. Powers rams him into the post and comes off the top with a sledge. Whip to the corner and a clothesline sends Lawler out of the ring for a breather. Back inside, Lawler grabs a headlock. Crisscross and Powers with a hip toss, followed by a slam. So. Much. STALLING. Lawler hangs onto the ropes to avoid a dropkick. He yells at Powers to kiss his feet and lays into him with a right hand. Crowd continues to taunt Lawler with chants of “Burger King.” Lawler starts taunting Randy Savage, and I can safely say that doesn’t go anywhere. Lawler meets a boot charging into the corner. Powers with a fist to the midsection and running knee lift. Whip and a back drop. He tries it again but Lawler counters with the Piledriver for three (with a handful of tights) at 6:17. Jim Powers’ final TV appearance until June the following year. ½*


- Typhoon vs. Yokozuna (w/ Mr. Fuji) – From the April 10th episode of Mania, taped on March 8th from North Charleston, SC. Gorilla Monsoon and Lord Alfred Hayes are calling the action. Yokozuna is now a former WWF Champion thanks to his 2-minutes on top near the conclusion of WrestleMania IX. Shoving match to start. Typhoon comes off the ropes with shoulder tackles, staggering the FORMER WWF CHAMPION. He tries it one too many times, however, and gets planted with a belly-to-belly suplex. Whip to the corner, Fuji with a distraction, allowing Yokozuna to crush Typhoon with the avalanche. Banzai Drop finishes at 1:53. The exact same formula they did with Yokozuna against Earthquake a couple of months ago.


- From the pages of the WWF Magazine, here’s Update with Gorilla Monsoon?! MY WORLD IS UPSIDE DOWN. We see the segment from Monday Night Raw where we find out about Fuji and Yokozuna protesting the result of their “match” with Hulk Hogan. Decision time is upon us, and Jack Tunney is standing by: There was an oral contract. Fuji issued the challenge, Hogan accepted, and a sanctioned WWF referee was in the ring. The decision is that Hulk Hogan remain the WWF Champion.


- From the April 10th episode of Superstars, “Mean” Gene Okerlund is standing by to hype an upcoming show at the Nassau Coliseum on May 1st. Mr. Fuji and Yokozuna come in (with Okerlund selling having his foot stepped on) to cut a promo on “Hacksaw” Jim Duggan. Shawn Michaels defends the Intercontinental Title against Mr. Perfect (and referred to Pat Riley, then-coach of the New York Knicks). Perfect says Perfect reminded him of Grover from Sesame Street… because he was trashed. THAT’S OSCAR, DAMMIT. Okerlund also announces Bret Hart taking on “The Narcissist” Lex Luger. Later in the show, Okerlund name-drops Doc Rivers. These interviews seem from a bygone era, before the WWF did the Event Center set-up.


- “Hacksaw” Jim Duggan vs. Damien Demento – From the April 11th episode of All-American Wrestling, taped on March 9th from Augusta, GA. Gorilla Monsoon and Lord Alfred Hayes are calling the action. Duggan is back from injury and seeking revenge against Yokozuna, THE FORMER WWF CHAMPION. Duggan tosses chairs in the ring to try and psyche out Demento. They start with a slugfest. Duggan with a trio of clotheslines, sending Demento to the floor for a conference with the man that lives in his finger. Back inside, Duggan with more punches and a hip toss. Demento to the floor for another timeout. That leaves one remaining for those keeping score. Demento with a cheap shot and choking. Duggan’s bumping continues to be the dirt worst in the WWF. Duggan makes his comeback, plants Demento with a slam, and finishes with his signature clothesline at 3:47. By this point, Demento was dropping to the bottom of the barrel, almost Barry Horowitz and Steve Lombardi territories below “star” JTTS’. Oh, and this was the last match to feature Lord Alfred Hayes on commentary (unless you can’t the AWF, since it’s retirement community WWF). DUD


- Mr. Hughes vs. J.D. Stryker – From the April 11th episode of Wrestling Challenge, taped on March 9th from Augusta, GA. Mr. Hughes’ in-ring debut, with no fan fare or vignettes introducing him to the audience. Jim Ross makes his syndication debut, taking Monsoon’s spot calling the action with Bobby Heenan. Hughes levels Stryker at the bell with a clothesline. Whip to the ropes and he connects with a power-slam, picking his opponent off the canvas at two. Crisscross, Hughes catches a body press attempt and counters with a back breaker for another “two-count.” He continues putting the boots to Stryker and finishes with the Sidewalk Slam at 2:12. If that isn’t a sign the Big Boss Man is gone, I don’t know what is. Hughes always had an intimidating presence, but bell-to-bell, he was never anything special.


- Tiger Jackson (w/ The Bushwhackers) vs. Little Louie (w/ The Beverly Brothers) – From the April 11th episode of Wrestling Challenge, and probably the first “Midget Match” on WWF syndication in forever. We’ve already covered our knowledge on Jackson and Louie, so jumping right in. I honestly expect the same spots from the 6-Man Tag from two weeks ago. Jackson dances around, doing some Stooge inspired movements before slapping Louie. Louie responds by picking a fight with Earl Hebner. Jackson works the arm until Louie escapes with some butt-biting. Tiger isn’t too happy and shows it by biting the referee in protest. We get a comical chase around the ring afterwards. They do the “referee catches the midget and tosses him back on the other for a pin” spot. Jackson blames Louie for slapping Hebner, so Hebner shoves Louie down. Jackson gets tripped up and Louie spins him on his head like a top. Louie with an airplane spin, making himself dizzy in the process. Butch comes in illegally, slams Tiger on top of Louie, and that’s it for the three-count at 4:32. Post-match, The Bushwhackers clear the ring of the Beverly Brothers. Not bad for what it was (Midget Comedy).


- Scott Steiner (w/ Rick Steiner) vs. Irwin R. Schyster (w/ Ted Dibiase) – From the April 12th episode of Monday Night Raw, from the Mid-Hudson Civic Center in Poughkeepsie, NY. They shoot a show-opener with Money Inc. paying off The Beverly Brothers for a scouting report. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out the Steiner Brothers are next in line for a shot at the Tag Team Titles. Scott goes for the arm but I.R.S. goes to the ropes. Scott blocks a cheap-shot, but I.R.S. counters with an enzuigiri. Whip to the ropes and Scott takes him over with a power-slam. Back inside, Scott runs through with a shoulder tackle. I.R.S. tries a drop toe hold but Scott gets the upper-hand with a hammer-lock. Scott works the arm, hooking a modified cross-face. I.R.S. with an elbow to the face but a suplex is countered by Scott with his own suplex for two. I.R.S. with a shot in the corner and tosses Scott out, where Dibiase greets him with a clothesline. We come back from commercial with I.R.S. in control. He connects with a piledriver for two. Scott escapes a chin-lock and a slug-fest ends with I.R.S. laying Scott out with a back breaker. He goes to the top and meets a boot on the way down. Scott with mounted punches and steps on the tie to keep I.R.S. from bailing. Whip to the ropes and a back drop, followed by the double under-hook suplex. Dibiase rushes in to break the cover, drawing the cheap DQ at 9:51. Post-match, both teams brawl until the Beverly Brothers come out, but that leads to heel miscommunication and the Beverly’s clearing the ring of Money Inc. Interesting post-match antics to what was a solid match with a bad finish. **1/2


- From the April 12th episode of Monday Night Raw, Rob Bartlett is standing by for an interview with Luna Vachon to talk up her actions at WrestleMania IX where she viciously attacked the Sensational Sherri on several occasions. If anyone is unfamiliar with Luna, she has the sides of her head shaved and half of her face painted to look like veins. She says he’s the woman of the 90’s and erases the line between genius and insanity, then calls Sherri a witch. The audience musters a decent “Sherri” chant. Sherri comes out, walking with a purpose. She calls Luna a half-breed and disgrace to the WWF. They trade verbiage that basically amounts to “lets fight.” Sherri strikes first with a kick and takes Luna over with a suplex on the floor… and tears up Bartlett’s shirt for reasons unknown. Luna strikes back with a belt and more clothes get torn. Sherri with a microphone wire to choke Luna. CATFIGHT! CATFIGHT! Sherri tears Luna’s tights and tosses her into the crowd, and finally Sgt. Slaughter and a handful of referees come to create order. When we come back, Randy Savage picks up the interview with Sherri, who’s covering her chest with Savage’s cowboy hat. Luna returns for Round 2 but gets pulled away. Sherri says if Luna want a piece of her, she’s got it. “OH YEAH!” This was a bit risqué for the era and seems weird for them to suddenly focus on a rivalry between two woman that will be able to back it up in the ring.



- Friar Ferguson vs. Chris Duffy – From the April 12th episode of Monday Night Raw, and the debut of Ferguson. It’s Mike Shaw, last seen in WCW as Norman (the Lunatic), and better known to a wider audience as Makhan Singh. Here he’s basically a wrestling version of Friar Tuck from Robin Hood. Duffy with shoves, drawing the ire of the Friar. Duffy attempts a piledriver but gets taken over with a back drop. Ferguson with a leg drop before sending Duffy to the floor with a slingshot. Whip to the corner and a hip toss, followed by a clothesline. Ferguson dances to exactly one person’s response. Ferguson with a slam and big splash for two (he let the jobber up, and you hear the crowd audible groan at the prospect of the match continuing). Whip to the corner and an avalanche. He blesses Duffy as the match has not only died, but decomposed, and we’re only 3-minutes in. Bartlett is back at ringside, doing his best Herb Abrams impression (looking busted up and fueled by drugs). The crowd chants something I can’t make out. WHY IS THIS MATCH STILL GOING? Duffy’s sunset flip attempt is countered with the drop down splash and it’s finally over at 4:43. You ever heard “went over like a fart in church?” Ferguson would only make one more TV appearance (making the save for a jobber following a match with Bam Bam Bigelow) before the gimmick was scrapped and Mike Shaw repackaged.


- From the April 17th episode of Superstars and the pages of the WWF Magazine, here’s Update with Sean Mooney. Seems like things are shuffling around, and no one knows quite where they’re going yet. We recap the segment from Monday Night Raw between Sherri and Luna. I’ve ignored Updates recently since they mostly recap stuff I’ve detailed enough already. Why feature it this time? Sean Mooney’s FINAL TV Appearance after 5-years with the company. Thank goodness, years later, he’d give us some personality doing stuff for WWE like the Edge & Christian Show and hosting the DVD set “Unreleased.”


- “The Rocket” Owen Hart vs. Bam Bam Bigelow – From the April 17th episode of Superstars, taped on March 8th in North Charleston, SC (SIX WEEKS IN THE CAN?!). Owen hits Bigelow with a dropkick at the bell and pounds away with rights. Owen catches a boot from Bigelow and gets blasted with an enzuigiri. Bigelow with clubbing forearms across the back. Crisscross, Owen feeds the boot for his own enzuigiri. He hits Bigelow with a push-off dropkick and takes him down with a missile dropkick. He comes off the ropes with a sunset flip for two. Bigelow counters an arm-bar with a slam but misses an elbow drop. Owen goes back to the arm, taking Bigelow to the canvas. Bam Bam rakes the eyes and hits his own push-off dropkick, knocking Owen out of the ring. Bigelow follows and slams him face-first onto the apron. We come back from commercial with Bigelow knocking Owen off the apron with a headbutt. Owen with a shoulder to the midsection and flip back into the ring. He goes for a crucifix cradle but Bigelow counters with the Samoan drop. Bam Bam with a press slam, dropping Owen across the top turnbuckle. Whip and Bigelow presses Owen high in the air for a crash landing. Owen fights free of a bear-hug and goes for a slam with the expected result. Whip to the corner for a chest-first bump. Owen tries to flip off the top rope, but the knee gives out on the spot. Bigelow sends him back across the ring and misses the avalanche. Owen hobbles a bit, so Bigelow plants him with a slam and finishes with the flying headbutt at 6:26. The injury must’ve been legit, as there’s no appearances for Owen between March 10th and May 1st. Better than average syndication match that ended abruptly. ***


- The Nasty Boys vs. The Beverly Brothers – From the April 18th episode of Wrestling Challenge, taped on March 9th from Augusta, GA. Heenan and Ross talk-up the tag division, and somehow ignore the Headshrinkers in the mix of contenders. Sags and Beau start. Lockup to the corner and Beau complains about a phantom hair-pull. Lockup and Sags pulls the hair for the hell of it. Sags ducks under a clothesline and takes Beau over with a hip toss. Knobbs with a clothesline and elbow drop for two. Blake tags in and runs into a hip toss. Knobbs with a slam and clothesline, turning Blake inside-out. Sags with an elbow for two. They continue working on Blake’s arm until a cheap-shot from Beau turns the tide. We come back from commercial with Blake putting the boots to Knobbs. Beau with a second-rope axe-handle smash. Blake chokes with the tag rope with the referee distracted. Beau with the leap-frog splash for two. Knobbs blocks a suplex, countering with his own. The first attempt at the hot tag is cut-off, with Knobbs knocked to the floor and sent into the security barricade. Back inside, Knobbs slams Blake down with a handful of hair and finally hot tags Sags. He runs wild on Beau with rights and it’s time for the Pit-Stop. Sags with a double DDT to the Beverly Brothers for two. Knobbs in, only to get tossed out. We get heel miscommunication, and Sags rolls Beau up for three at 10:08. This was surprisingly decent. **1/2


- From the pages of the WWF Magazine, here’s Special Report with Lord Alfred Hayes. In case you missed WrestleMania IX, Mr. Perfect was attacked from behind by Shawn Michaels while he was attempting to finish what he started in the ring with “The Narcissist” Lex Luger. Alfred says Perfect is hungry for violent vindication.


- Virgil vs. Razor Ramon – From the April 19th episode of Monday Night Raw, taped on April 12th. What is with all the Virgil this month? Did the babyface locker room get quarantined with the Kangaroo Flu? Ramon continues to flounder with nothing to do with his Main Event push over. They fight over a hammer-lock until Razor casually hooks the ropes. Virgil with a waist-lock and Razor again goes to the ropes. Ramon with headlock takeover, countered with a head-scissors. Virgil with a small package for two. He goes to work on the arm as the crowd chants “Razor.” Virgil with a terrible hip toss and they manage to blow a roll-up. Virgil with punches in the ropes before missing a dropkick. Razor slows things down with an abdominal stretch. Virgil escapes and misses an elbow. Razor’s lack of enthusiasm continues with an STF. Virgil teases another comeback, but he’s quickly put away with the Razor’s Edge at 6:58. I’ve seen enough of Virgil now to last me a few lifetimes. ½*


- Money Inc. vs. The Beverly Brothers – From the April 19th episode of Raw. Non-Title Match since the Beverly Brothers haven’t won a match since 1992. McMahon points out that both teams are disliked by the fans, in case we didn’t know it was heel vs. heel. Money Inc attack from behind and it’s a brawl until Blake is the last man standing. I bet it feels like final cut-down day at Spring Training. Blake and Dibiase trade wrist-locks until Dibiase grabs a headlock. He misses an elbow, allowing the Beverly’s to work the arm. Blake with a cross arm-breaker. Dibiase fights to the corner, but the referee misses the tag. Looks like Money Inc. are playing faces. Blake with a snap mare, then back to the arm. They tease another tag, but the referee disallows it with Irwin’s feet off the apron. He finally gets the tag on attempt #3 and misses an elbow drop. The Beverly’s work the arm and Beau adds salt to the wound by choking him with the tag rope. We return from commercial with I.R.S. in control of Beau with a front face-lock. Dibiase with the illegal switch, so now they’ve swapped places on the face and heel dynamic. Whip to the ropes, Beau catches Dibiase with his head down and punts him on the chest. Beau with a swinging neck breaker and Blake gets the “hot” tag. He plants Dibiase with a slam and Beau drops an elbow for two. Beau with a back drop for two. Double teaming on Dibiase leads to miscommunication and Dibiase rolls Beau up for three at 10:57. The EXACT SAME FINISH as the match against the Nasty Boys from the 4/19 Challenge. Another perfectly fine match. **1/2


- Vince McMahon is standing by for an interview with the former WWF Champion, Bret “Hitman” Hart. McMahon paints the picture of WrestleMania IX, where Bret walked into his title defense as the underdog. Bret says he’s been an underdog all his life, and he liked going to the ring as the underdog. He wants people to know he isn’t finished. He’s lost the Tag Titles twice and the Intercontinental Title twice. The skeptics have counted him out before, and they were wrong, and they’re wrong again. He promises to reach the top, and he’s making himself a “Hit List.” The first guy on that list is “The Narcissist” Lex Luger, and name drops Yokozuna and Hulk Hogan being on the list as well. The last one got a mixed reaction, if not a negative one.


- Since I’ve nowhere to really put this, the April 19th episode of Monday Night Raw marked the final appearance of Mr. Rob Bartlett. I don’t think anyone noticed or cared at the time.


- From the April 24th episode of Superstars, “Mean” Gene Okerlund is standing by from the Event Center to promote the May 22nd card at the Meadowlands Arena. Tickets are $2 off for children 12 years of age or under. Among the matches signed includes the Main Event of Money Inc. defending the Tag Team Titles against The Mega-Maniacs (The Maniacs promo was clearly taped immediately before or after WrestleMania, since Hogan still has his busted left eye).


- From the April 24th episode of Superstars, Raymond Rougeau is standing by for an interview with Bam Bam Bigelow. Before he can make it to the stage, The Sensational Sherri interrupts because she has some things to say to Luna Vachon. She says she’s woman enough to confront someone face-to-face and challenges her to a match. Bigelow takes exception to this, getting in Sherri’s face and trying to shove her aside. He grabs her by the wrists and teases striking her, drawing Tatanka from the locker room to make the save. He knocks Bigelow off the platform with a dropkick, giving Bigelow a chance to show-off his bumping skills. Tatanka boots Bigelow away and dives on him before laying in with a series of rights. I’m sure Bigelow won’t retaliate any time soon.


- Billy and Bart are on horseback and are coming to the World Wrestling Federation. I guess it’s been a while since the WWF has had a cowboy gimmick. No mention of their last names, and no hint that they’re brothers, referring to each other as “my partner.”


- From the pages of the WWF Magazine, here’s Update with Gorilla Monsoon. The right arm of Lex Luger is under investigation after months of knocking out his opponents with the same technique: a well-placed strike with his right forearm. We see highlights of Luger attacking Bret Hart from behind at the WrestleMania IX brunch. Jack Tunney has found X-rays of the forearm, revealing he has a steel plate and several screws placed in the forearm, a surgery performed following a motorcycle accident last Summer. Tunney says he can’t do anything to Luger, and we get a promo from Luger gloating about his unfair advantage.


- Tatanka is scheduled for a match against Steve Vega on the April 24th episode of Superstars. They do the “play the music several times”, as if it magically transports someone to the ring. We see on the video wall what is keeping him from competition: Bam Bam Bigelow has immediately struck back, knocking Tatanka unconscious, and to add insult to injury, trims some of the red hair that represents his Native American heritage. “HE’S RAPING THE DIGNITY OF ALL NATIVE AMERICANS!” OK, maybe Vince McMahon didn’t say it, but I’m sure we can all imagine it.


- The WWF returns to the Nassau Coliseum on May 1st with Kamala taking on Bam Bam Bigelow in a WrestleMania Non-Rematch, Bob Backlund goes against Blake Beverly, The Nasty Boys collide with the Headshrinkers, Shawn Michaels defends the Intercontinental Title against Mr. Perfect, Jim Duggan seeks revenge on Yokozuna, and Bret “Hitman” Hart faces “The Narcissist” Lex Luger.


- The WWF’s latest Pay-Per-View offering, The King of the Ring, is finally hyped on TV in the form of promos for next week’s episode of Superstars, as we get comments from Mr. Perfect and Doink (the Clown) regarding their head-to-head qualifying match. Yes, we’ve seen commercials for the PPV, but we’ve yet to hear anything of detail that concerns the show (taking place June 13th).


- Kamala vs. Papa Shango – From the April 25th episode of All-American Wrestling, taped on March 8th from North Charleston, SC. It’s the 500th Episode of All-American. What, you thought celebrating the number of episodes was a modern thing with Monday Night Raw? Gorilla Monsoon and “The Wizard” are calling the action. Who’s that? Bruce Prichard. On his podcast, he claims it was an homage to the manager of yesteryear, “The Grand Wizard.” Monsoon doesn't understand why Kamala is afraid of the smoking skull, considering his savage past. Shango pounds away with rights. Whip to the corner and Shango follows in with an avalanche. Kamala avoids a second attempt and works Shango over with the usual. Kamala misses the Big Splash, allowing Shango to take over with face pulling. These men are so important, the entire match plays second-fiddle to the revelation of Lex Luger's loaded forearm. Kamala gets dumped to the floor, but sees Slick being manhandled and makes the save. Shango bails following a Super-Kick, and they waddle back to the locker room for a CHEAP Double Count-Out at 3:33. Really? Needed to protect these two!? The three words that describe this and I quote: Stink, Stank, Stunk. DUD


- Mr. Perfect vs. Blake Beverly – From the April 25th episode of Wrestling Challenge, taped on April 6th in Phoenix, AZ. They hype Perfect’s KOTR Qualifying Match against Doink. Did You Know… Mr. Perfect and The Beverly Brothers were both briefly managed by “Coach”? Beverly attacks before the bell and chokes him out with the towel. Perfect mounts a comeback and sends Blake to the floor following a shoulder tackle. Perfect with a headlock, and an odd video cut leads to a dropkick... that came out of nowhere. Beau Beverly shows up and gets worked over... what, No Disqualification called?! Perfect with a snap mare and rolling neck snap on Blake. Things calm down, with Blake regaining control. Blake with a neck breaker, but no cover. Perfect comes off the ropes with a body press, but Blake maintains control. Blake makes the mistake of setting up for a back drop, and the Perfect-Plex finishes at 5:23. That became quite the predictable finish for babyface Mr. Perfect matches. Not too much to see here, but it was watchable. Quietly we bid farewell to another Superstar, as this marks the final TV appearance for Wayne Bloom (Beau Beverly). *


- Raymond Rougeau is standing by for an interview with “The Narcissist” Lex Luger. Jim Ross whines on commentary that Luger should be forced to wear a brace or padding of some kind. He milks his TV time, admiring his reflection and forces Rougeau to hold his robe. Rougeau paints the picture of Luger’s tenure in the WWF, knocking people out left and right, and saying he has an unfair advantage. Is this an interview or Ray Rougeau cutting a promo? Luger cuts the same “Update” promo about life not being fair, and life isn’t fair to him by having to look at the “fat, disgusting people, with globs of fat hanging from your waist.”


- Lex Luger and Bob Backlund cut promos hyping their King of the Ring Qualifying Match on next week’s episode of Wrestling Challenge.


- Mr. Perfect vs. Damien Demento – From the April 26th live episode of Monday Night Raw from the Manhattan Center. Demento speaks to the little man that lives in his finger for advice. Perfect sends him to the floor with a dropkick. Back inside, Perfect controls with chain-wrestling. Demento uses the tights to toss Perfect to the floor as the crowd chants something at Demento. Are they saying “LSD”? Demento’s offense consists entirely of punches and kicks. Perfect comes back with chops. He lands a boot to the midsection and hits a running knee lift, followed by a rolling neck snap. Demento gets an elbow up in the corner on a charge. A splash meets knees, and Perfect finishes with the Perfect-Plex at 4:58. Just another match. *


- “There’s no hope with dope.” You thought it was something new where the WWF used TV time to do public service announcements?


- Crush vs. “The Narcissist” Lex Luger – From the April 26th episode of Raw, and the first time we’re seeing Luger in action since the big reveal of his loaded forearm. They do a long lockup with Crush sending Luger into the corner. Next up is a test-of-strength, with Luger cheating to gain the unfair advantage. Vince constantly calls Crush “The Original Hawaiian Punch.” I’m sure trademarking that worked out for him. Crush fights free and press slams Luger with ease! Crush reverses a whip and connects with a dropkick. We come back from commercial with Crush working the arm. Crush blocks a hip toss and counters with a belly-to-belly suplex for two. He misses a charge and gets knocked to the floor with a running high knee. Luger follows, sending him into the post. Back inside, Luger works the back with a bear-hug. Crush escapes but runs into a power-slam. Crush counters a suplex with his own and follows up with a back suplex. Crush with a slam and leg drop for two. He applies the Cranium Crunch, but here’s Doink and Doink to create a distraction. IT WORKED. Luger uses the opportunity to KO Crush from behind with the loaded forearm, knocking him out of the ring for the Count-Out at 10:47. Slow at times, but a decent match all things considered. The weak finish is acceptable with the need to protect both men. **


- Vince McMahon is in the ring for an interview with the reigning Intercontinental Champion, Shawn Michaels. McMahon says sooner or later his path will cross with Mr. Perfect, but NEXT WEEK, he defends the Intercontinental Championship against “Hacksaw” Jim Duggan. Michaels antagonizes the crowd insinuating a couple of men were on TV in a parade, drawing a “Shawn is gay” chant. I’m thankful fans these days, no matter how dumb they can be, at least don’t stoop to that level. Shawn continues to mix up his Sesame Street references. We see highlights of Michaels’ attack on Mr. Perfect at WrestleMania IX.


Final Thoughts: WrestleMania IX is in our rear-view mirror, and there’s a lot to talk about. We’ve got Hulk Hogan as the NEW WWF Champion, and it seems like things aren’t settled between himself and Yokozuna. Shawn Michaels and Mr. Perfect are penciled in for a feud over the Intercontinental Title based on a randomly put together attack at WrestleMania IX. Speaking of an attack at WrestleMania IX, that is how they’ve kicked off a program between Sherri and Luna, leading to a catfight on Monday Night Raw. Sherri’s anger and thurst for revenge ticked off Bam Bam, who’s attempts at assaulting a woman were thwarted by Tatanka. The kind gesture was repaid by the Beast from the East with an unwanted haircut. Bret Hart is out for revenge with Lex Luger #1 on his Hit List. Speaking of Luger, it’s revealed his forearm is loaded with a steel plate and screws. We’ve seen the debuts of Mr. Hughes and Friar Ferguson in the ring and Jim Ross (and “The Wizard”) in the broadcast booth, the hyped arrival of “Billy and Bart”, and said farewell to, among others, Beau Beverly, Sean Mooney, and Rob Bartlett. Finally, we have something called “King of the Ring” to look forward to. Goodness, we’ve covered a lot, and we’ve got months coming up with even more!
Posted Image
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
The S.S. Nintendo
Member Avatar
dWb Superstar
[ *  *  * ]
Taking me back to my younger days of watching WWF.
S.S.Nintendo's DVD Collection

S.S.Nintendo's Game Collection

Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF @ Paris, France – April 8th, 1993 – Televised on Canal+, one of the many shows we’ll be covering from the Post-WrestleMania IX European Tour. Matches from most of the shows we’re going to cover were compiled for the Coliseum Video “Global Warfare”, released in August ’93. Raymond Rougeau is calling the action along with an unknown partner. Unknown to me because I don’t speak French, and they don’t have a graphic on the screen for identification purposes.


- WWF Intercontinental Championship Match: Shawn Michaels (c) vs. Bob Backlund – Michaels comes out to the Sherri version of his theme song despite switching it out quite a while back. We get a pre-recorded promo from Michaels on the streets of Paris. Stalling to start. Lockup and Michaels takes Bob over with a headlock, followed by a hip toss. Michaels a slam and some posturing in the corner. Backlund comes back with his own hip throws, a delayed power slam, and back slide for two. Michaels tries to bail, but Backlund gives chase. Michaels works Backlund over from the apron but gets nailed with a fist to the midsection. Backlund slows things down with a wrist-lock. Michaels escapes with a thumb to the eye but misses a charge into the corner. Backlund goes back to work with his (seriously) dated grappling offense. Michaels escapes again, sends Backlund to the outside, and introduces him to the security barricade. Back inside, Michaels continues pounding away. He comes off the ropes with a double axe-handle and grounds Backlund with a front face-lock. Backlund escapes with an over-head throw for a two-count. Michaels resumes with the basic offense. Backlund sets Michaels across the top rope and slaps the taste out of his mouth. Backlund with a dropkick and that move where he jerks the head of his opponent between his knees. Swinging neck breaker gets two. Piledriver (and a beauty!) for two. Michaels counters a roll-up and hooks the tights to retain at 13:20. This was dull as dish-water. *1/4


- Crush vs. Doink (the Clown) – WrestleMania IX Rematch! According to TheHistoryofWWE.com, Steve Keirn is under the Doink costume for the UK tour. Doink hides under the ring, but the sneak attack attempt fails, with Crush pummeling him with headbutts. He tosses Doink around the ring and stomps a mudhole in him. Doink tries to take advantage with a game of cat-and-mouse, but that doesn’t work either, with Crush still in complete control. Crush with a back breaker, followed by a leg drop. He goes to the top rope and ends up missing a flying knee drop. Doink puts the boots to the leg and wraps it around the post. Doink continues punishing the leg with nondescript offense. His trip to the top rope proves unsuccessful as well, eating boot. Crush with more clubbering and a tilt-o-whirl back breaker. Whip to the ropes and a boot sends Doink out of the ring. Crush brings him back in with the Cranium Crunch. He releases the hold, and Doink decides to take the Count-Out at 8:14. Should we have expected anything but a crap finish? Fine for what it was, but you can tell it was Keirn working instead of Borne. *1/2


- The Nasty Boys vs. The Headshrinkers (w/ Afa) – The last time I covered this show, I needlessly buried the Headshrinkers. I’d like to correct myself and say I’m an idiot for suggesting so. Lots o’ stalling to kick things off. Samu attacks Knobbs from behind and pounds away. Whip to the ropes and Knobbs comes back with a clothesline. He sends Samu into the post and lays him out with another clothesline. The Nasties use him as a ping-pong ball before he bails out to the floor for a breather. We’re 5-minutes in, by the way. Back inside, and the Headshrinkers work over Knobbs. He makes his own comeback, tagging out to Sags. They do the test-of-strength, and of course Fatu cheats. Sags returns fire and Knobbs comes back in with a sloppy single-arm DDT. Knobbs with an elbow drop for two. Afa trips up Sags and Samu knocks him to the floor with a Super-Kick. Afa takes a cheap shot at Sags with a chair with the referee distracted. Back inside, the Headshrinkers take turns working Sags over. Samu with a slam, but he misses a flying headbutt. Knobbs runs wild and hits both Shrinkers with clotheslines. Knobbs hits a double DDT as the bell rings at 11:35. The action continues with wooden chairs being thrown in the ring. Samu breaks one over the back of Knobbs. It keeps going on and the official decision is a Double Disqualification. What a sloppy finish to a weak match. ½*


- Mr. Perfect vs. “The Narcissist” Lex Luger – Another WrestleMania IX Rematch! Perfect brings Luger into the ring with a sling shot and pounds away in the corner. Whip across the ring, followed by a hip toss and a back drop. Perfect with a charging clothesline for two. Perfect sweeps the leg and traps the knee, smashing it into the canvas. He continues working the leg, sitting down across the knee. Luger reverses a whip to the corner, giving Perfect a chance to over-sell the bump into the turnbuckle. Luger works on the back with forearms and rakes the eyes along the top rope. Whip to the corner for more high impact damage. Luger with a back breaker and a sit down splash across the back for two. Luger with a series of elbow drops for two. Perfect reverses a whip and hits the big forearm. Sunset flip for two. Perfect grabs a sleeper, but it’s quickly broken. Perfect sends Luger into the corner and hits another forearm (The Axe!). Perfect with a series of atomic drops and clothesline for two. Whip to the ropes, Perfect with a fist to the midsection, running knee lift, and Russian leg sweep for two. Swinging neck breaker for two. Crisscross and a mid-ring collision puts both men down. Perfect with a sloppy roll-up for two. Luger with a bridging back suplex. Perfect gets the shoulder up, Luger doesn’t, and that’s that at 6:44. Not a fan of that finish, since it really does nothing for either man. Slightly better than their WrestleMania match, thanks to less resting and the work being a bit more fluid. **3/4


- Kamala vs. Kim-Chee – Since this was a French exclusive show, I stand by my “last Kim-Chee match” comment from his April 5th Monday Night Raw appearance. Have you noticed that Slick is missing in action more lately? Kim-Chee yells at Kamala to start. #BeAStar Kim-Chee! He pounds away at Kamala and the crowd doesn’t care. Kamala misses a charge but recovers quickly enough to grab a bear-hug. Kim-Chee gets sent to the floor and we get stalling. Lots of it. Back inside, Kim-Chee regains control, choking Kamala cross the rope. Chin-lock. Kamala rallies, slapping his belly as motivation. He hits Kim-Chee with a strike to the throat, followed by a headbutt. Scoop slam and splash, and eventually Kamala gets the cover right for three at 6:45. This was awful. -*


- Typhoon vs. Damien Demento – OK, maybe I want to see more Kamala vs. Kim-Chee after all. Demento starts by talking to Mr. Bimbo, the man who lives in his finger. Lockup and Typhoon with a shove. They do the rest-of-strength, and yes, Demento cheats before transitioning into a wrist-lock. Typhoon uses his immense power to escape and take Demento to the corner. Whip across the ring and Typhoon misses the charge. Demento with an elbow and leg drop for two. He puts the boots to Typhoon and grabs a chin-lock. Demento keeps Typhoon grounded putting the entire crowd to sleep in the process. Demento chokes Typhoon across the middle rope for two. Typhoon catches Demento coming off the ropes in a bear-hug and repeatedly crushes him in the corner. Typhoon hits the avalanche and finishes with a Power-Slam at 6:25. Another bad match. DUD


- “Hacksaw” Jim Duggan vs. Yokozuna (w/ Mr. Fuji) – Yes, this is the scheduled Main Event, and not just a random match to close the show. Yokozuna is wearing the Ultra-Rare black on black color scheme for his tights. Duggan DOESN’T come out with the U.S. flag. I’m sure the French audience wouldn’t dump on him for it. Duggan, seeking revenge, attacks before the bell with clubbering blows. He goes for his 22x4, but the referee prevents him from using it. Duggan goes back to the old reliable (punching) but gets dropped with a double thrust to the chest. Yokozuna with an elbow to the head and choking across the rope. Duggan tries to rally, but the comeback is cut short. Yokozuna with a massive leg drop before hooking a bear-hug. Duggan escapes with elbows but Yokozuna grabs the hold a second time. This time Duggan bites his nose to escape. Yokozuna misses the corner avalanche and gets laid out after a series of clotheslines. Duggan signals for the finish and predictably gets tripped up by Mr. Fuji, allowing Yokozuna to squash him in the corner and finish with the Banzai Drop at 7:33. Post-match, Duggan avoids being squashed again and chases Yokozuna from ringside with the 2x4. About what you’d expect from these two. *


Final Thoughts: One good match out of seven. The European Tour ended up featuring most of the roster, but a good chunk of them were kept in the states for the April 12th tapings for Monday Night Raw, meaning guys like Bret Hart, Bam Bam Bigelow, The Steiner Brothers, Money Inc., The Undertaker, and Razor Ramon were all absent from the tour until the tour split into two tours, with shows in Newcastle (the same card as here) and Brussels (Bret/Bigelow, Steiners/Monet Inc, Taker/Gonzales) on April 14th. I think we can safely say that this was the “B” tour (and notice WWF Champion Hulk Hogan is nowhere to be seen). We've still got shows in Sheffield, Milan, and Barcelona to cover. Pray for me.
Posted Image
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF UK Rampage ’93 – Presented on Sky Sports on April 11th, 1993 from the Sheffield Arena in Sheffield, England, it’s our next stop in the Post-WrestleMania IX European Tour, and we’ve got the same crew that worked the show in Paris on April 8th, with quite a bit of shuffling to give us “fresh” matches. I’m almost afraid to see what we must sit through. Jim Ross and Bobby Heenan made the trip across the pond, so that’s a plus, right? Our pal Samoa Rowe originally covered this show for Da’ Site (I wonder what scumbag sent him a copy), so now it’s my turn to suffer.


- Nasty Boy Knobbs vs. Headshrinker Fatu (w/ Afa) – Seriously, THIS is our opener? At least we don’t have to sit through Sags vs. Samu later in the show (seriously, why is Sags absent from the card? Wait, why do I care?). Tony Chimel is doing ring introductions, early in his run with WWE that spanned two decades. Knobbs plays to the crowd while the Samoans do their pre-match ritual. Fatu attacks from behind with clubbering. Whip is reversed, and Knobbs hits him in the corner with a clothesline. Whip and a back drop, sending Fatu to the floor for a breather. Back inside, Knobbs with a side headlock and shoulder tackle. Afa with a phantom distraction (Knobbs fed the leg to be tripped and Afa missed the spot) allowing Fatu to take control. Fatu gets the better of a slugfest and nails Knobbs with a clothesline. Knobbs blocks a piledriver and counters with a back drop. He unloads with rights, but Fatu thumbs the eye to regain control. Knobbs gets dumped to the floor, where Afa lays him out with a cheap shot. Fatu follows and plants him with a slam. Back inside, Knobbs fights out of a chin-lock and turns Fatu inside-out with a punt. Never seen anyone do that bump for a kick before. Knobbs with a slam and clothesline, giving him another chance to over-sell. Knobbs with mounted corner punches. Whip across the ring, Knobbs runs into a Super-Kick, and Fatu covers (with feet on the ropes) for three at 9:44. Surprisingly not awful. *1/4


- Kamala vs. Doink (the Clown) – I’m not expecting much from this, either. The big topic of discussion is the Double Doink spot from WrestleMania IX. Steve Keirn is under the paint again (Borne was still in the US for an appearance on Raw). The referee searches Doink and finds a long piece of wood hidden in his jacket. Lockup and Kamala shoves Doink to the canvas. Doink takes Kamala off his feet and boots the back of his head. Kamala with chops, but the momentum is broken with another takedown. Kamala with a hip toss and more chops. Whip to the corner and Kamala follows with an avalanche. Doink bails out and crawls under the ring. He pops out from the other side and attacks Kamala from behind. Back inside, Doink comes off the top with a double axe-handle. He goes to the top again, but this time Kamala meets him on the way down with a chop. Whip and a double thrust to the chest, followed by the big splash, but he doesn’t know how to properly pin anyone. Doink recovers, rolls Kamala up, and hooks the tights for three at 5:54. Two matches, two cheap roll-up finishes. ½*


- Mr. Perfect vs. Headshrinker Samu (w/ Afa) – OK, who booked this show? How random is PERFECT vs. SAMU for a television audience? Lockup and Samu with a shove into the corner. Perfect with a side headlock and shoulder tackle. Crisscross, Samu misses a body press, and Perfect hits him with his own. Perfect with arm drags and a dropkick, sending Samu out of the ring for a breather. Back inside, Samu wants a test-of-strength, but Perfect doesn’t bite. They do another crisscross, this time ending with Samu turning Perfect inside-out with a clothesline. Samu tosses him over the top rope and Afa adds a kick to the midsection. Samu comes off the apron with an axe-handle and rams Perfect into the steps. Back inside, Samu rams his own knee into the turnbuckle. Perfect traps the leg, driving it into the canvas, and applies a spinning toe hold. Samu goes to the eyes, forcing a break. Perfect gets sent to the floor again and takes a headbutt from Afa. Back inside, Samu with a super-kick for two. Perfect tries to rally but Samu goes to the eyes again and tosses him out for a third time. Samu with a series of headbutts, double leg sweep, and headbutt to the midsection. He plants Perfect with a slam and hits another headbutt for two. They get into a slugfest, won by Perfect. He knocks Samu down to the canvas and boots him repeatedly in the face. Samu with a questionably low-blow. Perfect counters a slam with a small package for two. Perfect gets tossed again. Perfect sweeps the leg and wraps it around the post. Back inside, Samu with a slam and headbutt. He misses a flying headbutt and Perfect finishes with the Perfect-Plex at 13:35. Trim this down a few minutes and it would’ve stood out more, but Samu’s limited offense was obvious, and hurt the match. **1/2


- Bob Backlund vs. Damien Demento – This show is never going to end. Backlund avoids a lockup and does the middle-aged man shuffle. Backlund with a leg sweep and more dancing. Demento with clubbering blows. Whip to the ropes, Backlund blocks a forearm and takes him over with a back slide for two. He comes off the ropes with a forearm, knocking Demento over the top rope. Back inside, Demento with a hip toss and a slam. He plants Backlund with another slam and hooks a chin-lock. Backlund escapes, throwing Demento across the ring. He comes off the ropes with a sunset flip for two. Demento with a cheap shot from the floor. Back inside, Demento with an elbow, snap mare, and leg drop for two. Backlund escapes a seated chin-lock, dropping Demento on his face. He goes for a slam, but Demento lands on top for two. Whip, Backlund ducks a clothesline, and gets three with the O’Connor Roll at 7:58. It can’t get much worse than this. ¼*


- Typhoon vs. The Brooklyn Brawler – OH. MY. GOD. Why?!?! Brawler uses his speed to avoid Typhoon and taunts him like a grade school aged child. Lockup and the Brawler is shoved out of the ring. Typhoon shrugs off an over-head wrist-lock and knocks him out of the ring with a dropkick. Typhoon with a hip toss, but he misses an elbow drop. Brawler puts the boots to him, including a stomp to the gut. He controls with choking, biting, and a chin-lock. I’d say I’m ignoring some stuff, but I’ve literally missed nothing in my play-by-play. Typhoon finally escapes with elbows. Whip to the corner and he misses an avalanche. Brawler with more stomping to the gut. He makes the dumb choice of attempting a slam. Typhoon with a slam of his own, followed by an avalanche. Power-slam finishes at 8:32. Whoever was the agent for this match should’ve been fired. -*


- WWF Intercontinental Championship Match: Shawn Michaels (c) vs. Crush – After the last two matches, this looks great on paper. Lockup and Crush shoves him into the corner. Shawn’s slam attempt is met with a traditional pie-facing. Michaels with a side headlock but Crush carries him into the corner. Crush with his own side headlock. He catches Michaels’ leap frog with a bear-hug, but Michaels quickly escapes with a thumb to the eyes. Crisscross and Crush with a back breaker, sending Shawn to the floor for a breather. Crush gives chase, a mistake considering how easily Shawn outmaneuvered him. Whip and a clothesline, completely no-sold by Crush. He lifts Shawn up with a press slam, teasing tossing him over the top rope. Crush with a clothesline, knocking Shawn over the top rope, to the floor. Back inside, Crush throws Michaels into the corner. Whip across the ring and he misses a shoulder tackle. Michaels comes off the ropes with a high knee, knocking Crush through the ropes. Shawn follows, slamming Crush into the barricade. Back inside, Shawn comes off the middle rope with a pair of double axe-handles. Shawn with an elbow across the back of the head, followed by a DDT for two. Crush escapes a chin-lock with elbows and blocks the Super-Kick. He lays Shawn out with a clothesline and catches him off the ropes with a big boot. Crush with a delayed vertical suplex and leg drop. He calls for the finish but Shawn bails. He grabs the IC belt and takes the cheap Count-Out loss at 8:53. Post-match, Crush tosses him back in the ring, hits a tilt-o-whirl back breaker, and applies the Cranium Crunch. Another weak finish in a series of them tonight. *3/4


- “Hacksaw” Jim Duggan vs. “The Narcissist” Lex Luger – This is seriously the final match of the night. NOTHING on this card would qualify as a real Main Event in my eyes. Yokozuna and Mr. Fuji are watching from ringside, so expect a crap finish. Duggan has slightly altered tights, now wearing a singlet and his knee pads are designed like the American flag. He leads the Sheffield crowd in a U-S-A chant. Lockup into the corner and Luger with a cheap shot. Whip to the ropes and Duggan comes back with a trio of clotheslines, sending Luger to the floor for a breather. Back inside, Duggan unloads with rights. Whip and Luger counters a back drop with a boot to the chest. Luger with clotheslines, giving Duggan a chance to showcase his Bushwhacker Luke level of bump taking. Dugan escapes a chin-lock with elbows to the midsection. Whip to the corner and he meets a boot charging in. Luger with an elbow drop for two. Duggan with another rally, cut short with a knee to the midsection. Duggan sends Luger to the turnbuckle to create separation. He no-sells Luger’s strikes and mounts him in the corner with rights of his own. Whip is reversed and a shoulder tackle knocks Duggan to the outside. Yokozuna comes over and sits down across the chest with the referee distracted. He tosses Duggan back inside, where Luger hits him with the loaded forearm but Mr. Perfect makes the save before the three-count could be made, drawing a Disqualification at 6:44. It wasn’t good, but it was kept short. *


- In a post-show Dark Match, Jim Duggan pinned Yokozuna in less than 4-minutes following the same script that ended WrestleMania IX.


Final Thoughts: A slightly-above average match between Mr. Perfect and Samu is the only highlight of a show littered with weak matches and even worse finishes. Luger/Duggan on top with a terrible finish, Crush/Michaels with a terrible finish, singles matches like Typhoon/Brawler, Backlund/Demento, and Knobbs/Fatu… just an oddly put together show that promised nothing and delivered even less (yes, I stole that line from an old issue of the Wrestling Observer).
Posted Image
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Erick Von Erich
Member Avatar
I'm Big E and I tell it like it is
[ *  *  * ]
Michaels was really playing the Chickensh*t Heel role in 1993, huh? Bringing in Diesel as his "bodyguard" worked for this character, too.
DWS Apparel Store- Buy. Consume. Obey.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
Breaking him away from Sherri really pushed him to the next level. With Sherri, he was just another mid-card heel with a manager. Here he's coming into his own both in the ring and on promos.
Posted Image
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF @ London, England – April 15th, 1993 – Fan-Cam recording from the Wembley Arena with a reported 11,000 in attendance. The video is a bit grainy, but it’s shot at a decent enough distance that it can be overlooked, especially compared to other overseas shows that found their way into the hands of American tape traders.


- Typhoon vs. Damien Demento – God… Damn it. Lockup and Typhoon with a shove to the canvas. High-spot of the match, I’m sure. Lots of stalling from Demento, which somehow makes the match better. Typhoon asks for a test-of-strength and Demento naturally cheats to gain control with an overhead wrist-lock. Typhoon forces things into the corner and gets a thumb to the eyes. Whip to the corner and Typhoon misses an avalanche for a near fall. Demento with elbow drops for another two-count. Demento with a leg drop across the midsection and more choking. Typhoon fights out of a chin-lock (and a gratuitous edit to save my sanity) but misses an elbow drop. Demento with choking and stomps to the gut. Typhoon starts no-selling until a diving shoulder tackle takes him off his feet. Demento to the middle rope and he gets caught in a bear-hug. Typhoon crushes him in the corner and connects with a clothesline. Whip to the corner, Typhoon with an avalanche, and a power-slam finishes at 7:42. You know you’re having a bad night when DAMIEN DEMENTO carries a match. Not as bad as I anticipated. *


- Kamala vs. Kim-Chee – I hope we’ll get a Brooklyn Brawler match on this card. Slick didn’t cross the pond to be with Kamala on this tour. Kim-Chee barks at Kamala (figuratively, not literally) and gives him the business with a lot of finger pointing and a slap to the face. Kamala reverses a whip to the corner but misses an avalanche. Kim-Chee with shoulder tackles. He fights out of a bear-hug but fails miserably at a slam attempt. Kamala with a Super-Kick, knocking him out of the ring. Back inside, Kamala teases violence, but he’s become a good-natured cannibal, so Kim-Chee takes a cheap shot at him. He takes control with the usual assortment of choking, kicking, and biting. Things slow down with an F’N chin-lock. Kamala escapes, only to get taken off his feet again. Kamala escapes a second chin-lock and nails Kim-Chee with a double thrust. Kamala with a slam, chop to the belly, and splash. It takes him a while, but eventually covers Kim-Chee properly for three at 7:29 (shown). Not good. ¼*


- Crush vs. Doink (the Clown) – Don’t be surprised if this is the semi-Main Event, the star power on this part of the tour is that poor. Doink’s sneak attack is met with a boot to the midsection. Crush blocks a second boot and connects with an atomic drop, followed by a clothesline. Doink bails and wanders the crowd for a bit. How did he not get counted out?! IT’S BEEN ALMOST TWO MINUTES! Back inside, Doink aggressively rakes the eyes. Whip is reversed, and Crush catches him with a back breaker. Crush rakes the eyes, takes Doink over with a suplex, and connects with a leg drop. He hangs Doink up across the top rope and hits him with another back breaker. He makes a rare trip to the top rope and misses a flying knee drop. Doink targets the knee as the crowd enjoys some air-horn. I’m suspecting it’s Steve Keirn under the mask based on his in-ring style. Crush’s comeback is cut off and Doink applies a single-leg crab (and yes, he uses the ropes for leverage). Crush fights off a toe-hold and avoids an elbow drop. He ducks a clothesline and comes off the ropes with a running dropkick, knocking Doink out of the ring. Crush follows, only to get slammed into the ring post and counted-out at 8:05. Post-match, Crush gets his revenge by tossing Doink with a gorilla press slam, hitting him with a tilt-o-whirl back breaker, and applying the Cranium Crunch. Started fine, but it seems like any time Crush starts selling, the match falls off a cliff. *1/2


- “Hacksaw” Jim Duggan vs. Yokozuna (w/ Mr. Fuji) – OK, this would probably be one of the legit “top two” matches on the tour (again, it’s a sad state Jim Duggan, in 1993, is headlining). It’s always nice for European crowds to get behind Duggan’s patriotism. Duggan attacks from behind and unloads in the corner with rights. He grabs the 2x4 but the referee intercepts, allowing Yokozuna to get a clean shot in on the defenseless Duggan. He quickly works in a choking spot in the ropes, giving Fuji a chance to jab him with the flag pole. He must be getting paid extra, because he chokes Duggan with it moments later. Duggan teases a comeback, throwing more right hands. Yokozuna slows him down again by going to the eyes. Whip and Yoko grabs a bear-hug. Duggan escapes, only to run into a thrust chop. Yokozuna measures him up and drops the massive leg. Duggan escapes another bear-hug, the only way he knows how: by fighting dirty. Yokozuna misses the avalanche but doesn’t go down. Duggan with a trio of clotheslines to finally knock the big man off his feet. Duggan sets up for the big clothesline but Fuji trips him up. Yokozuna uses the distraction to squash Duggan in the corner and finishes with the Banzai Drop at 7:27. Post-match, Duggan clears the ring with his 2x4. That bear-hug spot was death. *1/4


- WWF Intercontinental Championship Match: Shawn Michaels (c) vs. Bob Backlund – We’ve got three matches and 75 minutes to fill. Oh God, everything’s going extra-long, isn’t it? I hate when the bell rings and then we wait 2-3 minutes for Shawn to remove his entrance gear. Lockup into the ropes and a clean break. Michaels picks the leg but Backlund kicks him off. Shawn with a side headlock and shoulder tackle. He hangs onto a head-scissors for far longer than I expected. Backlund with two escapes and no follow-up. We’re at 8:00 and I’ve covered every offensive move. They fight over a hammer-lock, and we finally get a decent sequence with actual effort… ending with a head-scissors. Michaels tries to do a head-stand to escape, and that backfires. This match takes me way back… to 1977, when it was the style at the time in the Northeast of the US. Michaels bails to the floor and camps out there to chew the clock some more. Back inside, Michaels grabs a Full Nelson. Does he have the fingers locked, though? Backlund counters, with Michaels flailing around to dramatically over-sell it. Michaels with an arm drag, hip toss, and slam. He sends Backlund to the floor with a knee lift. Back inside, Michaels with some choking. Snap mare into a chin-lock. GOD, PLEASE END THIS MATCH. Backlund goes for a slam but Shawn lands on top for two. Backlund escapes another chin-lock and comes off the ropes with a body press for two. SHAWN WITH A THIRD CHIN-LOCK. Backlund with arm drags and a slam, followed by a sloppy swinging neck breaker for two. He follows that up with an even worse piledriver for two. Michaels counters a roll-up and hooks the tights for three at 23:28. That’s 24-minutes of my life I’ll never get back. DUD


- The Nasty Boys vs. The Headshrinkers (w/ Afa) – Oh man, I can’t wait to sit through 20+ minutes of the NASTY BOYS. I can’t imagine any world where that much time given to them produces a good match. Oh well, at least it isn’t The Bushwhackers. It’s a slugfest to start, with the Nasty Boys clearing the ring. Back inside, Knobbs lays into Samu with rights and follows him into the corner with a clothesline. Samu meets a boot trying to the same and Knobbs takes him over with a suplex. Knobbs with another whip to the corner, and this time Samu pops back out with a clothesline. Fatu misses an elbow drop, allowing Sags to tag in. He grabs a side headlock and comes off the ropes with a shoulder tackle. Samu trips Sags up from the outside, allowing Fatu to lay him out with a Super Kick. Sags gets dumped to the floor and planted with a slam. We cut ahead to Sags fighting out of a chin-lock and slamming Fatu face-first. Fatu no-sells it, of course, and goes back to pounding away. Headshrinkers with a double headbutt and Samu drops a series of elbows for two. Knobbs gets the most casual hot tag and runs wild with right hands. Another double headbutt turns the tide and Fatu connects with a back breaker. Whip and Knobbs with a punt to the chest. Sags no-sells a slam and stands around talking trash. OK? Sags and Fatu do a test-of-strength as we continue with an oddly structured format. The Nasties take turns working the arm, a sequence you’d expect the match to start with. Fatu comes back with a headbutt and we’re back to square one. Headshrinkers with a wish-bone. Sags fights out of a nerve-hold but gets double-teamed in the corner. Samu with a flying forearm for two. He goes for a reverse splash (Vader Bomb) but meets knees and Knobbs finally gets the real hot tag. Rights and a back drop to Samu, followed by a clothesline to Fatu, turning him inside-out. Afa hops on the apron and takes a shot as well. Heck breaks loose, the referee gets shoved, and he calls for the bell at 12:28 for a Double Disqualification. Both teams continue to brawl, with a chair involved, with the Nasty Boys standing tall at the end. Watchable, and at least they were always doing stuff. **


- Mr. Perfect vs. “The Narcissist” Lex Luger – Final match of the night (THANK THE F*CK CHRIST). Luger wastes time on the floor to stretch things out. Lockup, Luger with a side headlock takeover and Perfect counters with a head-scissors. Next, they fight over a hammer-lock until Luger goes to the ropes to force a break. They jockey for position in the corner, with Luger scoring a cheap-shot over the shoulder of the referee. He sends Perfect into the corner and rakes the eyes across the top rope. Luger wins the wrist-lock battle and bars the arm. Perfect escapes, takes Luger over with arm drags and comes off the ropes with a running dropkick, knocking Luger out of the ring for a breather. Back inside, Perfect blocks another cheap-shot attempt and unloads with rights. He takes Luger over with a back drop, and once again, Luger chews the clock outside the ring. Perfect brings him back in with a slingshot, sweeps the leg, and slaps on a spinning toe hold. Luger goes to the eyes to create separation. Whip to the corner, Perfect takes a chest first bump and Luger drops him across the top rope. They take it to the floor, with Perfect being introduced to the ring steps. Luger with choking across the top rope. Perfect escapes a chin-lock with blows to the midsection, but Luger quickly puts him down with a clothesline. He drops a pair of elbows for two. Perfect wins a slugfest and comes off the ropes with a sunset flip for two. He ducks a clothesline and hooks a sleeper, but Luger forces a break in the corner. Whip to the corner is reversed and Perfect sends Luger into the corner with a slingshot. He unloads with the big forearm and connects with an atomic drop. Inverted atomic drop and clothesline for two. Running knee lift and Russian leg sweep for two. Crisscross and a collision puts both men down. Perfect with a roll-up for two. Luger with a back suplex, but Perfect gets the shoulder up and he doesn’t, and that’s our Main Event finish at 19:26. Another match that went too long, but at least it didn’t seem like a deliberate attempt to have a shit match. *1/2


Final Thoughts: Why do I keep watching these shows? I love wrestling, even when it’s bad. This portion of the European Tour produced bomb after bomb, with a lack of star power and overall poor quality matches from top to bottom.
Edited by Scrooge McSuck, Jun 15 2018, 11:55 PM.
Posted Image
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF @ Barcelona, Spain – April 24th, 1993 – Presented on Tele-5 from the Palau Sant Jordi, with Hector Del Mar and Jose Luis Ibanez calling the action, and Miguel Alonso conducting interviews that I’m going to ignore. The televised portion of the show features five matches, with two matches exclusive to the attending audience: The Bushwhackers def. The Beverly Brothers, and The Undertaker def. Yokozuna via DQ.


- Virgil vs. “Terrific” Terry Taylor –
I’m running out of negative things to say about Virgil, so here’s hoping he got his meat sauce at Olive Garden. No ring entrance for Taylor, poor bastard. Lockup and Taylor with an arm drag. Virgil blocks another and counters with his own. He connects with his butt-ugly dropkicks, sending Taylor to the floor for a breather. Back inside, Taylor goes for a handful of hair, and I won’t lie, that’s a funny spot. More stalling. Virgil controls with a side headlock. Whip to the ropes and Virgil with a body press for two. Taylor with a handful of tights to send Virgil to the floor. Back inside, Taylor with a jaw breaker and atomic drop for two. Chin-lock. Virgil with a sunset flip but Taylor remains in control. Virgil escapes another chin-lock but gets caught in a sleeper hold. Virgil with another comeback, laying into Taylor with rights and connecting with an atomic drop. Taylor tastes the turnbuckle 10-times and Virgil hits the Russian leg sweep for two. Diving clothesline for two. Taylor misses a charge and Virgil with a crucifix cradle for three at 12:31. This was a lot of nothing. ½*


- Tatanka vs. Papa Shango – Somehow, I doubt this is going to be a good match. Lockup to the corner and Shango with a cheap-shot. He pounds away at the midsection until Tatanka comes back with a series of chops. Whip to the corner and Tatanka charges in with a clothesline. Shango meets a boot on a charge attempt and gets sent to the floor after a series of clotheslines. Back inside, Shango wants a test-of-strength, and to the surprise of no one, cheats for the unfair advantage. Shango with a slam, but he misses a jumping elbow drop. Tatanka with a slam. He gets nailed coming off the top rope. They manage to blow a spot with Tatanka getting thrown over the top rope. He pulls Shango out with him and throws some more chops. Back inside, Shango catches him off the ropes with a side slam for two. Tatanka starts his War Dance, and he lays into Shango with more chops. Whip and a back drop for two. Whip is reversed and Tatanka with a roll-up for three at 6:36. Could’ve been worse. ¾*


- WWF Tag Team Championship Match: Money Inc. (c) vs. The Steiner Brothers – FINALLY, something that could be decent. The match is JOINED IN PROGRESS (damn you, commercial breaks!), with Scott coming off the ropes with a shoulder tackle on Dibiase. Dibiase with a knee to the midsection and tags I.R.S., who instantly misses an elbow and gets worked over. I.R.S. tries to take a breather, but Scott grabs him by the tie and hangs him across the top rope. Whip to the ropes and Dibiase trips him up. I.R.S. with a knee, sending Scott to the floor, where Dibiase sends him into the post and ringside barricade. Dibiase with a double axe-handle and face stomp for two. I.R.S. with cheap shots in the corner with the referee distracted. Whip to the ropes and Dibiase with a clothesline for two. Scott escapes a chin-lock, sending Dibiase into the turnbuckle. Rick hot tags and unloads with rights and lefts, followed by clotheslines (STEINER-LINE!). He plants Dibiase with a slam and Scott knocks I.R.S. with a dropkick. Scott with a clothesline from the middle rope for two. Whip is reversed and Rick counters a leap-frog with a power-slam. Scott with a Franken-Steiner on Dibiase, but I.R.S. breaks the cover with a shot with the tag team title, drawing the cheap Disqualification at 6:02 (shown). A longer, full match would be great, I’m sure. Fun Tidbit: Coliseum Video featured the entire match, and during the commercial, the camera crew cut away from the action, figuring footage wouldn’t be used. The PBP dubbed over buried the camera work for the entire break. **1/2


- “El Matador” Tito Santana vs. Doink (the Clown) – Once again, sources list Steve Keirn as the man under the Doink makeup (Borne was also working the tour, because…). The crowd is super-hyped for Santana, despite being a JTTS. Doink offers a handshake but Santana doesn’t trust the sincerity. Doink with an axe-handle to the back of the head. Whip to the ropes, Santana ducks a clothesline and connects with a dropkick. Doink tries hiding behind the referee, but no dice. Santana with a side headlock and shoulder tackle. Whip to the corner, Santana avoids the charge and hits a clothesline. Santana with rights, an atomic drop, inverted atomic drop, and dropkick. Whip, fist to the midsection, and El Paso del Muerte finishes at 2:54! WHAT THE HELL!? Santana just squashed the undefeated Doink! Barcelona must’ve been “If Santana ever loses here, we riot”. *


- Bret “Hitman” Hart vs. Bam Bam Bigelow – Main Event of the Night. I almost typed “WWF Championship Match” (sad face) out of habit. Lockup and Bigelow tosses Bret like Vince tossed him in the trash at WrestleMania IX. Bret with a side headlock but gets rattled with a hard shoulder tackle. Whip to the ropes, Bret ducks a clothesline and connects with a dropkick. Bret rolls away from an elbow drop attempt and works on the left arm. Bigelow rakes the eyes to escape and pounds away. Bret ducks under another clothesline and lands on top of Bigelow to escape a press slam. Bret with more rights and diving elbow, sending the Beast from the East to the outside. Bret follows for a dive from the apron, but Bigelow catches and rams him into the post. He takes a quick breather and does it again for the hell of it. Bret teases a comeback before taking a hard bump into the corner. Bigelow continues punishing the back and slaps on a bear-hug. Bret escape but gets taken down with a back suplex for two. Bigelow with headbutts to the back and an over-head back breaker. Bret escapes and connects with his own back suplex. Bigelow remains in control, connecting with a double under-hook back breaker. He misses the flying headbutt, opening the door for Hart’s comeback. Bret with a flurry of rights and boots, followed by a Russian leg sweep for two. Bret with a diving clothesline from the second rope for two. He comes off the ropes with a bulldog and goes for the Sharpshooter, but Bigelow powers out. Bigelow grabs another bear-hug but this time Bret escapes with biting. He goes for the back suplex, but Bigelow shifts his weight, landing on top of Hart for two. Whip to the corner, Bret with a boot to the face and victory roll for three at 11:56. Good match that was almost all action. ***1/2


Final Thoughts: With only five matches featured (and one of them being under 3-minutes in bell-to-bell length), two good matches is enough to make this a decent card. Bret/Bigelow and Steiner’s/Money Inc. all delivered better matches within the next few months, but after sitting through those cards in France and England, this was a breath of fresh air, even with Virgil and Taylor stinking it up in the opener and Tatanka/Shango delivering practically nothing, as well.
Posted Image
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF @ Milan, Italy – April 25th, 1993 – Presented on Tele+2 from the Forum Assago with Dan Peterson calling the action and Guido Bagatta conducting backstage interviews that will go ignored. Dark matches featured Virgil going over Terry Taylor, and in an unusual choice, Scott Steiner over I.R.S. Why? The televised portion of the card has Money Inc. defending the Tag Team Titles against The Steiner Brothers!


- “El Matador” Tito Santana vs. Doink (the Clown) – Will Santana have the same success he had in Barcelona? Probably not. Doink is, and I’m not kidding, introduced as “The Evil Clown, Doink”, as if we didn’t get the hint before. Doink offers the handshake, but Santana still won’t fall for it. Doink avoids several lockups and hits Santana with a sucker punch. Santana quickly responds with a dropkick, causing Doink to hide behind the referee. Santana with a side headlock and shoulder tackle. Whip and Santana with a forearm, sending Doink to the floor. Back inside, Doink thumbs the eye and tosses Santana out. Back inside and Doink works the arm as the camera gets a close-up of Doink’s jacket and umbrella. FORSHADOWING. Doink with knees to the forearm, followed by some stomping. Santana teases a comeback, but Doink cuts it off with a well-placed punt to the chest. Whip to the corner and Doink posts himself on the failed charge attempt. Santana comes off the ropes with a clothesline and pounds away with rights. He hits an atomic drop, an inverted variation, and the Flying Forearm, but Doink gets a foot on the ropes at two. Santana puts pressure on Doink in the corner but gets nailed with something from the jacket (the umbrella, perhaps?), and Doink steals the three-count at 8:44. That’s the finish I think we’d expect ever time (Damn you, rioting Barcelona fans). *1/2


- WWF Tag Team Championship Match: Money Inc. (c) vs. The Steiner Brothers – Again, I’m always looking forward to the matches between these two teams. Money Inc. refuses to let the Steiner’s in, so the referee rules they’ll be stripped of the titles if they don’t let the challenges in. I always wished someone would call the referee’s bluff and dispute it with the authority figure. The Steiner’s quickly get the upper-hand and clear the ring. Dibiase pounds away on Rick and takes him over with a side headlock. Whip to the ropes and Rick comes back with a belly-to-belly suplex for two. Scott in, working on the left arm. Rick takes Dibiase over with a fireman’s carry and slaps on an arm-bar. Scott in with clothesline, arm drag, and side headlock. I.R.S. tags in and doesn’t have any more luck than Dibiase. Scott grabs I.R.S. by the tie and hangs him across the top rope for two.

Whip to the ropes and Dibiase trips Scott up, allowing I.R.S. to knock him through the ropes. Dibiase picks up from there, sending Scott into the barricade. Back inside, I.R.S. drops an elbow for two. Dibiase with a double axe-handle as we take a commercial break. We come back with Dibiase in control with a chin-lock. Scott escapes, using his momentum to throw Dibiase into the turnbuckle. I.R.S. cuts off the tag with another chin-lock. Scott escapes with a jaw breaker but he still can’t get to his corner. Dibiase with a perfectly executed suplex for two. Scott escapes a third chin-lock and takes Dibiase over with his own suplex. I.R.S. cuts him off AGAIN and they choke Scott out in the corner with the tag rope. I.R.S. with a snap mare, but he misses an elbow drop. Whip and Scott with a body press for two. Dibiase drops an elbow across the back of the head and tosses Scott to the floor. Back inside, Dibiase with a gut-wrench suplex for two. Scott lays everyone out and he still can’t get to his brother. I.R.S. meets a boot coming off the top and Rick FINALLY gets the tag. He runs wild, hitting both members of Money Inc. with clotheslines (Steiner-Line!). Scott comes back in with a pair of dropkick. Dibiase sets up for a piledriver on Rick but Scott clotheslines him from the middle rope for two. Whip is reversed and Rick with a power-slam. Scott with the Franken-Steiner, but I.R.S. breaks the cover with a belt shot, drawing the Disqualification at 15:02. This was kicking into high gear until the cheap finish. ***1/2


- The Undertaker (w/ Paul Bearer) vs. Yokozuna (w/ Mr. Fuji) – Looks like The Giant Gonzales missed a few dates, giving us this match instead. THANK GOD. It might be hard to tell for some, but Yokozuna is already packing on the weight compared to how he looked for his debut (and I’d still call him “Skinny Yokozuna” at this point). They do their traditional face-to-chest stare-down. Yokozuna throws the first punch and it’s no sold. Undertaker retaliates and comes off the ropes with a DDT. Yokozuna rolls away from an elbow drop and knocks him out of the ring with a clothesline. Fuji with a cheap shot, allowing Yoko to attack from behind. Back inside, Taker continues to no-sell and chokes away. Yokozuna comes back with a scoop slam and a massive leg drop. Taker sits up and gets put back down with a clothesline. He sits up again, so Yoko whacks him with the salt bucket for the cheap Disqualification at 5:43. Post-match, Undertaker avoids a Banzai Drop and hits the Choke-Slam to make the crowd happy. Fine for what it was. *1/2


- Tatanka vs. Papa Shango – I guess we’ve truly got our first stinker of the night unless a miracle is performed. Lockup to the corner and Shango with a cheap shot. Tatanka with chops, followed by a clothesline. Whip to the corner is reversed and Shango meets a boot charging in. Tatanka with three clotheslines, knocking the Voodoo Master out of the ring. Back inside, Shango wants a test-of-strength, and SHOCK, he takes a cheap shot for the unfair advantage. He puts Tatanka down with a slam but misses an elbow drop. Tatanka comes off the top, only to take a fist to the midsection. Shango sends Tatanka into the corner and continues to pound away. Tatanka’s comeback attempt is cut short, with him tossed over the top rope. They brawl at ringside and it’s not pretty. Back inside, Shango with a sloppy side suplex for two. Tatanka does the War Dance comeback and unloads with chops. He takes Shango over with a back drop, then pins him with a surprise roll-up at 6:00. Same finish as their match in Barcelona. Same match, pretty much. ½*


- The Bushwhackers vs. The Beverly Brothers – WHY DO YOU MOCK ME, OH LORD?! You can tell they’re going long with the never-ending stall session. Sadly, the crowd is into their licking and whacking behavior. NOT MY PAISANS! Beau works over Luke, who continues to be the worst bumper in the WWF. Luke responds by biting Beau’s bottom and the Bushwhackers clear the ring. MORE. STALLING. Blake nails Butch from behind. Whip is reversed and Butch connects with a knee lift and bulldog. Everyone brawls, with the Bushwhackers again getting the better of things. The Beverly’s take control (finally), working over Luke (shocker). Blake comes off the ropes for a splash but meets nothing but canvas. Beau cuts off a tag and hits a second-rope axe-handle. The double teaming continues with little of note taking place. Blake takes a shot at Butch and dumps Luke out of the ring. Whip to the corner and Luke pops out with a clothesline. Butch with the hot tag, running wild with clotheslines. The Battering Ram connects, followed by a diving forearm for two. Beau trips Butch up and Blake covers for two. We get heel miscommunication and Butch rolls up Blake for three at 14:42. What a shit-show. Good bye Beau Beverly, you won’t be missed and won’t have to suffer working with the Bushwhackers any more. -**


- Bret “Hitman” Hart vs. Bam Bam Bigelow – Main Event of the Night. Even though I’ve seen my share of matches between these two (and more to come!), I’m not complaining about getting good wrestling. Bigelow does a tumble to show-off his athleticism. Lockup and Bigelow shoves Bret out of the ring. Bret with a side headlock, but a shoulder tackle goes completely in Bam Bam’s favor. Bigelow rakes the eyes and pounds away across the back. Whip and Bret comes back with a dropkick. Bigelow misses a rebound elbow drop, allowing Bret to go to work on the arm. Bigelow tosses Bret into the corner but misses a charge. Bret with a series of knees into the elbow before going back to the arm-bar. Bigelow’s press slam attempt is countered with Bret shifting his weight, landing on top for a two-count. Back inside, Bret with a diving elbow, sending Bigelow to the floor. He tries a dive from the apron, but Bigelow catches and rams his back into the post.

Bret’s slow to his feet, so Bigelow goes back to the outside and sends him into the post again. He teases using the ring steps, but referee Earl Hebner talks him out of it. Back inside, Bigelow pounds the back and sends Bret hard into the corner. Headbutts to the lower back, followed by a delayed vertical suplex for two. Whip and Bigelow catches Bret coming off the ropes in a bear-hug. Bret claws at Hebner to sell the pain. Bret escapes for a moment but gets taken down with a back suplex for a near fall. Bigelow continues to punish the back and lifts him over-head in a body vice submission. Bret rolls through and takes Bigelow down with a back suplex of his own. Bret’s body press attempt is caught and countered with a back breaker. Bigelow with a slam and double under-hook back breaker. He makes a slow climb to the top rope and misses the flying headbutt. Bret unloads with a flurry of rights and takes Bam Bam down with a Russian leg sweep for two. Second rope clothesline for two. Bret with a bulldog but Bigelow fights off a Sharpshooter attempt. He catches Bret in another bear-hug, but this time Bret escapes with biting. He tries another back suplex, but this time Bigelow shifts his weight to crush Bret underneath for a two-count. Whip to the corner, Bret gets a boot up on a charge, and the victory roll finishes at 19:39. Even though we see similar patterns, they mix things up here and there each time out. ***1/2


Final Thoughts: Two really good matches on a six-match card, even if we’ve seen both match-ups enough times to last us a lifetime. Other than the Bushwhackers/Beverly Brothers stinker, everything else was kept short or was at least watchable (Yokozuna/Undertaker had some underrated chemistry that was usually ruined in matches by overbooked nonsense). The Bret/Bigelow headlining shows seemed like you were getting your money’s worth, while the shows with guys like Duggan and Luger on top not only featured poor main events, but atrocious undercards.
Posted Image
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
MONTHLY NEWS AND NOTES:


- With WrestleMania IX covered in great detail (far greater than I’ve ever done before, so I’d say I’ve definitively broken it down for all it’s good and bad, mostly bad, and will never need to look back on it again), we’ve got another PPV coming up in June: The King of the Ring. All things considered, very little is done in the month of April to hype the show. The same basic commercial would air, basically promising a single elimination tournament (WWE has NEVER done a double elimination, have they?). Regardless of the concept, it surprises me they didn’t do anything to hype the show until suddenly announcing Qualifying matches beginning the first week of May. As of the Spring of 1993, the WWF has held two PPV’s based around tournaments: The Wrestling Classic (November 1985) and WrestleMania IV (April 1988), neither credited as a success when it comes to the quality of the product. Thankfully the 1993 King of the Ring will only feature 8-men (from the field of “16” trying to qualify), so only 7 maximum tournament matches instead of 15. (Why I put 16 in parenthesis will be covered in the May Flashback, since it ties together with the TV product)

The King of the Ring itself was a concept that dates to 1985. The 1985 and 86 shows were held in Foxborough, MA in the month of July, while the 1987-89 and 1991 tournaments were in Providence, RI, either in September or October. No tournaments were held in 1990 and 1992, for those of you wondering, and the 1991 tournament is the only one to be known to exist via fan-cam footage (and the show sucked, by the way). Previous winners include (in order) The Magnificent Muraco, Harley Race (earning himself his “King” gimmick), Randy Savage, Ted Dibiase, Tito Santana, and Bret Hart. In a surprising bit of continuity, WWF Magazine ran an article that alluded to these tournaments, listing the winners that were still in the company in one of their fake interviews.


- Hulk Hogan, the NEW WWF Champion, worked a total of 0 house shows and TV tapings in the month of April. He was MIA, filming the pilot for Thunder in Paradise. Hogan’s only presence on TV were promos taped in the days immediately before or after WrestleMania, hyping appearances in May (specifically the May 22nd show at the Meadowlands Arena for the NY/NJ market).


- Since I’m on a Hulk Hogan kick, one of the more popular “rebooking” scenarios was pushing Randy Savage into the Main Event of WrestleMania IX. As much as the move to Hogan looks questionable with hindsight being 20/20, remember, business TANKED with Savage on top in 1992. House show numbers fell drastically and SummerSlam and Survivor Series, both without Hogan and both with Savage as one of the main pieces promoted, drew the WWF’s lowest ratings except for Tuesday in Texas (with the built-in excuse of being 6 days after a $24.95 PPV presentation, and with limited promotion). Moving forward from Savage was the right move, and even keeping the title on Yokozuna would’ve been a far more ideal situation. When it came down to it, Hulk Hogan’s name was still of value and WrestleMania IX, even though it was the lowest bought Mania at the time, still saw a noticeable increase of interest, making it look like a gamble worth taking. We’ll cover more of the Hulk Hogan and WWF Championship saga as we head into the Summer months.


- Except for TV tapings, most of April was WWF touring Europe, so not much to say there that hasn’t been covered in detail with shows recapped from Paris, Sheffield, London, Barcelona, and Milan. As far as the tapings are concerned, plenty of stuff from the Post-Mania IX dates were featured on the recently released Unreleased 1986-1995 DVD set, including a Dusty Finish IC Title Match with Michaels and Perfect and the debut of Billy and Bart Gunn. People getting tryouts included Ron and Don Harris (these two got tryouts almost twice a year it seemed), Steve “Wild Thing” Ray (of Abrams’ UWF fame), and The Lightning Kid (a smart-darling who gained national exposure on GWF).



… And that wraps up April, and yes, the Fan-Cam from London is what delayed me posting all the other European shows. I ordered another batch of Fan-Cams from '93 and '94 and then it took me three sit-throughs to recap it all because of time restraints (and Shawn/Backlund broke my spirit for one of those stoppages).
Posted Image
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF content the month of May went into overload. My recap is almost 16 pages long on Word and over 8,000 words. Should be finished sooner than later.
Posted Image
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
ZetaBoards - Free Forum Hosting
Join the millions that use us for their forum communities. Create your own forum today.
Learn More · Sign-up Now
« Previous Topic · Reviews and Columns · Next Topic »
Add Reply