Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]
Welcome to Da Wrestling Board. We hope you enjoy your visit.


You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.


Join our community!


If you're already a member please log in to your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
WWF Flashback: October 1991
Topic Started: Oct 3 2017, 08:59 PM (222 Views)
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF OCTOBER 1991


- Last time on the WWF Flashback… Coming out of SummerSlam, we have a unique instance where every Championship, even the quasi-title of the Million Dollar Belt, was held by a baby-face (Hulk Hogan as WWF Champion, Bret Hart as IC Champion, LOD as Tag Champions, and Virgil with the Million Dollar Title)… Ric Flair made his WWF debut, issuing challenges to Hulk Hogan and Roddy Piper. In one instance, Flair started a pull-apart brawl where Piper inadvertently blasted Vince McMahon with a folding chair… Jake Roberts is promising to bring a cobra to the ring with him from now on… Randy Savage allegedly trashed Jack Tunney’s office when his bid for reinstatement was turned down… Tito Santana will become EL MATADOR… Sgt. Slaughter wants his country back… Sid Justice squashed Big Bully Busick and Kato in his first couple of matches…


- From the pages of the WWF Magazine (and sponsored by Toys R’ US), here’s Update with “Mean” Gene Okerlund… Last week on Superstars, Ric Flair invaded the announcer’s position, triggering a brawl with Roddy Piper, and giving us a rare instance where good-guy announcer Vince McMahon gets clobbered and stretchered out. Flair and Heenan are standing by with comments. Flair said he was going to turn the heat up, and if Piper doesn’t like it, then do something about it. Until then, he needs to recognize him as the real World’s Champion.


- From the October 5th episode of Superstars, Sid Justice is the guest on The Funeral Parlor. Savage can’t help but be the #1 advocate for Mr. Justice. Paul Bearer says it’s only a matter of time until he’s bitten by a snake and returns to his parlor under different circumstances. Justice says he can still smell the presence of that “lowlife” Jake Roberts. When it’s all over, that Justice was served, and something about going to hell. I listened to him three times, and neither time I could make out what he said.


- Tito Santana is practicing his Matador techniques, and there’s just nothing here to give anyone hope that this will lead to anything important for Santana.


- Sgt. Slaughter is standing by from the Arlington National Cemetery, asking for forgiveness. He doesn’t care if he wrestles again, he just wants his country back.


- Greg “The Hammer” Valentine vs. Col. Mustafa (w/ Gen. Adnan) – From the October 7th episode of Prime-Time Wrestling, taped on September 9th from Ottawa, Ontario. Ratings for PTW aren’t very good and we need more first-run matches? Let’s keep putting the washed-up under-card guys on TV! That’ll solve the problem! Mustafa attacks from behind, using his pointy-toe boot to his advantage. I take it back, Skinner isn’t my new Boris Zhukov, it’s Col. Mustafa. Valentine “ducks” under a clothesline and connects with two of his own. He plants Mustafa with a slam and drops a wind-up elbow. He drops a headbutt across the midsection and wraps the left leg around the post. Mustafa regains control and grabs a chin-lock. Valentine escapes, but runs into a double thrust that Mustafa telegraphed by a week-and-a-half. Alfred Hayes said, and I quote, “he was too quick for Valentine”! Valentine comes back with chops and mounted blows in the corner. Mustafa with another kick with the loaded boot and a gut-wrench suplex. Valentine blocks a suplex and counters with his own. He signals for the Figure-Four, but Adnan blatantly interferes and doesn’t get his man DQ’ed. Valentine works Adnan over, Mustafa slowly stalks him, and we get a Double Count-Out at 6:55. Again, PROTECTING THESE TWO WITH A CRAP FINISH?! Valentine’s credible offense at least made parts of this watchable. ¼*


- Virgil vs. Tanaka – Also from the October 7th episode of Prime-Time Wrestling, taped on September 10th from Cornwall, Ontario. I’m surprised they’re still milking footage from those Canadian TV tapings. We’re joined in progress, with Tanaka sending Virgil to the corner and grabbing a side headlock. Crisscross and Tanaka bails on an attempted roundhouse right. Whip to the corner and Virgil runs into a crescent kick. Tanaka with chops to the forehead and a rake of the eyes. Tanaka with a low headbutt that probably should be considered a DQ. Tanaka with another super-kick, but he chooses not to go for a cover. He tosses Virgil out of the ring and hits ANOTHER super-kick… and you thought the move is over-done now? Tanaka snap mares Virgil from the apron and hooks a chin-lock. Virgil does the worst “rally before the arm drops three times” spot I’ve ever seen, flailing around like he’s never seen anyone do it before. Whip and Virgil with a sunset flip for two. Virgil with a clothesline, turning Tanaka inside out, and the Virgil Version of the Million Dollar Dream™ finishes at 6:47 (shown). I’ve seen worse from Virgil, but he’s still sub-par. *


- The Barbarian vs. Hercules (w/ Slick) – Final match from the October 7th episode of Prime-Time, taped on September 9th from Ottawa. Who doesn’t love heel vs. heel matches? The canned heat is out of control. Mooney reads my mind, drawing attention to the greying in Hercules’ mustache. Hercules with a side headlock, but a shoulder block does nothing. Barbarian’s posing gets cheers (or the good guy noise of the audio sweetening machine). Barbarian with mounted corner punches. Whip to the ropes and the crisscross ends with Hercules connecting with a short clothesline. Barbarian counters a back drop and connects with his own clothesline. Barbarian controls with a methodical pace. We come back from a commercial break, with Hercules using the tights to throw Barbarian out of the ring. Now it’s Hercules’ turn to put everyone to sleep. Barbarian spices thing up, taking Hercules over the top with a snap mare. Hercules quickly slows him down with a questionably low strike. Hercules with three covers, all for two-counts. Barbarian gets the better of a slugfest. Whip and he boots Hercules out of the ring. Back inside and Barbarian with a power-slam. Slick pulls Hercules to safety on the floor. Suplex from the apron, Slick sweeps the leg, and Hercules falls on top for three at 9:24. Post-match, Barbarian press slams Slick over the top rope. There wasn’t 2-3 minutes of standing around like I anticipated, but this was dull as dirt. *1/4


- From the pages of the WWF Magazine, here’s Update with “Mean” Gene Okerlund… The Survivor Series, a Thanksgiving Night Tradition, returns on Thanksgiving Eve on November 27th from the Joe Louis Arena in Detroit, MI. This year, the World Wrestling Federation Championship will be on the line, IN THE MAIN EVENT, when Hulk Hogan defends the title against The Undertaker in what is being billed as “The Gravest Challenge.” Paul Bearer wonders if Hulk knows what’s in store for him. Undertaker says there are no immortals on the dark side, and there he will learn that Hulkamania is dead. Hulk Hogan follows with his comments. He says Undertaker is dealing with immortality, the light and love of the Hulkamaniacs. He says don’t bother putting on the coffee, because they aren’t staying long, and Hulkamania will close the coffin on them. I’m somewhat shocked that the match was announced without an angle already in place.


- Bobby Heenan is standing by to introduce everyone to the REAL World’s Champion, Ric Flair. Vince McMahon scolds Roddy Piper to be the bigger man, and promises he’ll have his day. Heenan says everyone must admit he’s the real Heavyweight Champion of the World. Flair asks what are you going to do when Hulkamania runs wild. He’s going to grab a good looking woman, jump into a long limousine, and ask Hulk Hogan if he has the guts to jump on the Real World Champion. As for Piper, he’s learned not to doubt the word of the Real World Champion. He tells Hogan to forget about Hollywood and life after this sport. If he can walk the aisle, then prove to him by walking down the aisle and take him on. Whether you like it or not, you better learn to love it, because when it’s all over, he’ll possess the WWF Championship, the World Heavyweight Championship, and kiss all the girls.


- From the October 13th episode of Wrestling Challenge, Roddy Piper is the guest on the Barber Shop. Piper retells what happened on Superstars. He says his contract stipulates that any altercation with a Superstar means automatic termination. He calls Ric Flair a Phyllis Diller look-a-like. He apologizes in advance to all his buddies (all three of them) for anything he may do from this point forward, and warns everyone not to get between him and Flair.


- The Dragon vs. The Warlord (w/ Slick) – From the October 14th episode of Prime-Time Wrestling, taped on October 1st from Huntington, WV. Lockup and Warlord throws the Dragon to the canvas. Dragon comes off the ropes with a shoulder tackle, picks the leg, and drops an elbow across the knee. Rolling cradle for two. Warlord misses a charge and Dragon school boys him for two. He goes for a crucifix cradle, but Warlord counters with a Samoan drop and follows up with a clothesline. Warlord shrugs off an eye rake and continues to pound away. Whip to the ropes and he slaps on a bear-hug. Dragon escape, but unwisely attempts a slam. Warlord plants him with a slam of his own and drops a fist across the throat. Whip to the corner and a back drop. Warlord with another slam, but he meets the boot coming off the middle rope. Dragon with chops and a pair of dropkicks. He goes to the top and hits a flying chop, followed by a double axe-handle. He goes up once more, but Slick shoves him off, drawing a Disqualification at 6:24. Post-match, Dragon skins the cat and knocks Warlord out of the ring with a dropkick. This will be the last time we see “The Dragon” on the WWF Flashback… but more on that later. Good by Warlord standards. **


- Greg “The Hammer” Valentine vs. The Undertaker (w/ Paul Bearer) – From the October 14th episode of Prime-Time Wrestling, taped on October 1st from Huntington, WV, and recycled on the Coliseum Video “Super-Tape ‘92”. Undertaker with a whip to the corner, but meets a boot charging in. Valentine with chops, backing him into the corner. Whip and Taker counters a back-drop attempt. Undertaker with excessive choking in the corner. Valentine comes back with an elbow from the middle rope, followed by more strikes. He works the arm, but runs into a boot. Whip to the ropes and Taker hits his signature diving clothesline. Valentine rolls away from an elbow and slaps on the Figure-Four. Undertaker laying there, completely no-selling, is marvelous. Why is the referee not counting his shoulders down?! Valentine lets go to chase away Bearer, allowing Taker to come from behind with a clothesline and finishes with the Tombstone Piledriver at 5:26. Distraction finish, but at least Undertaker dominated the majority. Pretty bad match, though. ½*


- Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart vs. Skinner – From the October 14th episode of Prime-Time, taped on September 10th from Cornwall, Ontario and recycled for the Coliseum Video “Crunch Classic”. Neidhart has traded in the pink-and-black for goofy parachute pants and checker-board patterned boots. To children of the era, these two represent two of the worst Hasbro figures ever produced for the WWF line of merchandise. Skinner runs back to the locker room, for whatever reason. Lockup and Skinner with a side headlock. Crisscross and he takes Anvil over with a hip toss. SPITTOON BREAK! Another crisscross and hip toss from Skinner, complete with victory dance. Alfred seems over-concerned with the hygiene of Skinner and his ring attire as they do a spot where he may or may not have swallowed his chewing tobacco. Anvil with an atomic drop and clothesline. This is the same guy who worked with Stan Lane as the Fabulous Ones?! Neidhart with a handful of beard to hang on to a side headlock. Skinner cheap shots Neidhart with his Alligator Claw. He controls with the usual non-effort. I don’t even have a smartass comment for how bad and boring this is. Neidhart with elbows to escape a chin-lock, followed by a diving shoulder tackle. The “action” spills to the floor. They slug it out and we get a TIME LIMIT DRAW at 13:18?! WHAT THE HELL IS THAT?! SINCE WHEN DID THEY EVEN ANNOUNCE TIME LIMITS?! I hope whoever booked this match rots in hell. -**


- From the pages of the WWF Magazine, here’s Update with “Mean” Gene Okerlund… The Survivor Series is coming on Thanksgiving Eve, and we have another match added to the card, a traditional Survivor Series Elimination Match. On one side, Sid Justice, The Legion of Doom, and Big Boss Man take on the team of Jake Roberts, The Natural Disasters, and Irwin R. Schyster. Although I haven’t mentioned it (yet), the LOD quickly moved on from The Nasty Boys to feud with Earthquake and Typhoon, who were pushed for being the largest opponents the LOD ever had to deal with.


- Tito Santana continues his quest to become EL MATADOR, including stepping into the stadium to fight a real-life bull, in his full Matador garb. We switch back and forth from close-ups of Santana to a camera positioned way up in the stadium, making it impossible to see the stunt double doing all the actual work. Somehow, this newfound skill fighting bulls means he’s ready to conquer the Superstars of the World Wrestling Federation!


- From the October 19th episode of Superstars, “Hacksaw” Jim Duggan is the guest on the Funeral Parlor. The nearby coffin is colorfully decorated with Hulkster stickers, because we’ve got The Gravest Challenge to hype and no reason for the match to take place! Duggan does the only thing he’s useful for at this point, and that’s lead a chant of “U-S-A.” Paul Bearer is overjoyed to show-off the casket dedicated to the memory of Hulk Hogan to Duggan. There’s even a Hogan poster resting inside. Duggan calls Paul Bearer “Gomez Addams” and says there’s no way Undertaker can beat Hogan at Survivor Series. He says if Undertaker gets in his way, he’ll be “board” to death.


- Sid Justice vs. El Diablo – From the October 19th episode of Superstars. For enhancement talent, Diablo has a pretty good tan. Before the match can begin, The Undertaker and Paul Bearer come to ringside and strike a deal with El Diablo to take his place in the match. We don’t see what’s inside the briefcase they have, but we can only assume a pile of cash. I’m confused, shouldn’t Undertaker be stalking Hulk Hogan? Undertaker grabs a choke, and Sid does the same, backing Taker into the corner. Suddenly, El Diablo returns and unmasks to be Jake Roberts! He chokes Sid out with his karate belt. Paul Bearer rushes back from the locker room with a casket as Jake plants Sid with a DDT. They trap Sid in the ropes and Roberts opens the briefcase, revealing the bag that holds his safety glove and his new Cobra. Yes, there were air holes inside. Savage has a fit on commentary, banned from leaving his position to get physically involved. Duggan rushes out, dumps over the casket, and saves Sid before further harm could be done.


- Big Boss Man vs. Hercules (w/ Slick) – From the October 21st episode of Prime-Time Wrestling, taped on October 1st from Huntington, WV. I’m surprised to still see Slick making appearances at this point. Lockup, Hercules with a side headlock and shoulder tackle. Boss Man pops back up and cradles Hercules while he poses for a two count. Boss Man with a pair of slams. Hercules tries the same, but Boss Man counters. Whip and they botch something, so Boss Man rolls to the floor to nail Slick, pops back in the ring, and back drops Hercules to the floor. DOUBLE NOGGIN KNOCKER. Slick pulls Hercules to safety, leading to Boss Man straddling the ropes. Hercules with an inverted atomic drop for two. Clothesline for two. Boss Man fights into the early 90’s version of ground and pound. Hercules with a thumb to the eye and roundhouse rights. Is it weird I just now remembered Boss Man and Slick’s former relationship? Hercules keeps Boss Man up by the belt and continues to pound away. Boss Man mounts the comeback, planting a boot to the face and coming off the ropes with a splash. Whip to the corner and Boss Man meets the elbow. Whip reversed and the Boss Man Slam finishes at 7:36. What the… a clean finish?! Match wasn’t bad, to my surprise. *1/2


- Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart vs. Big Bully Busick (w/ Harvey Wippleman) – From the October 21st episode of Prime-Time Wrestling, taped on September 30th from Wheeling, WV. Wippleman complains about being called “Pee-Wee”. Neidhart grabs a side headlock, followed by a shoulder tackle. Crisscross and Neidhart counters a hip toss with one of his own. Wippleman hops on the apron, allowing Busick to sneak up on Neidhart and hang him across the top rope. Whip to the ropes and Busick with a clothesline. Busick with a rake of the eyes before slamming Neidhart face-first to the canvas. Snap mare into a chin-lock. Busick with more offense based around using the top rope. Whip to the corner and Neidhart meets him with a knee. He takes a bite out of his forehead and plants the Bully with a slam. Wippleman hooks the ankle to draw a Disqualification at 5:08. Anvil stomps on the hand of Wippleman and clears Busick from the ring to stand tall. Match wasn’t good, but compared to Neidhart vs. Skinner, looked like a lost classic. ¾*


- “El Matador” Tito Santana vs. Bob Bradley – From the October 26th episode of Superstars, and in-ring re-introduction of Tito Santana. Just like others, there’s more effort in putting over the “El Matador” name than Tito Santana, but they didn’t complete erase his name, despite the rebranding. Bob Bradley stuck around forever as enhancement talent, didn’t he? Lockup and Santana with an arm drag. Crisscross ends with a hip toss, and Santana goes back to the arm. Bradley fights free, but misses a charge and gets taken over. See, his bullfighting training came in handy! Bradley misses the charge to the corner, and Santana hits a flying clothesline. Whip, fist to the midsection, and running knee lift. The Flying Forearm (to the back of the neck) finishes at 1:28. I guess the move is called “El Paso del Muerte.” Same old Tito Santana, just with bright green tights.


- “Mean” Gene Okerlund is standing by for an interview with Jimmy Hart and The Natural Disasters. They’ve got their eyes set on the Tag Team Championship currently held by the Legion of Doom. Jimmy Hart puts over their size, and promises the Legion of Doom that Earthquake and Typhoon will be the next Tag Team Champions. This segues into hype for the Elimination Match at Survivor Series. Earthquake says there’s no man or team that can take them on, and they’ll eliminate the LOD at the Survivor Series. Typhoon adds nothing that hasn’t already been said. Not the best segment, and the tag division has lost a lot of steam throughout the year.


- SURVIVOR SERIES REPORT! There’s a new match announced, and boy is it loaded: Roddy Piper captains a team featuring Bret Hart, The British Bulldog, and Virgil to take on Ric Flair’s team, consisting of the “REAL” World Champion himself, The Million Dollar Man, The Mountie (JAILBIRD!), and The Warlord. With all those names, you can probably expect a lot of lame eliminations since this is the era of over-protecting anyone with even the smallest push.


- The October 28th episode of Prime-Time Wrestling has a Halloween feel to it, a shoe-string budget feel, but a feel nonetheless. There’s a bunch of pumpkins around the set, and we’ve got Jameson hanging around the studio, as usual. Goodness, I can’t think of a character that was presented as such a loser. Heenan says in Beverly Hills, they don’t give candy, gourmet food is prepared for you at the door. A doorbell rings, and Heenan doesn’t understand why since they don’t have doors! Heenan brings Jameson out of the audience and smashes a pumpkin over his head. Heenan offers to help by sticking his glasses onto the pumpkin. Jameson spends the rest of the show with the pumpkin on his head. The Bushwhackers off assistance, leading to more “comedy”, like Jim Duggan trying to pry it off with his 2x4. How did this trio not get cast in a Three Stooges remake? Freddie Blassie makes an appearance, because he was in the neighborhood. Apparently, the pumpkin came off thanks to a truck running over the pumpkin, and only leaving a big tire mark on his face.


- Big Bully Busick (w/ Harvey Wippleman) vs. The Brooklyn Brawler – From the October 28th episode of Prime-Time, taped on October 1st from Huntington, WV. Who books another heel vs. heel match, and with enhancement talent at that?! I guess someone longed for the Brawler’s three-week rivalry with Bad News Brown. We get an exchange of words and a shoving match to start. Brawler grabs a side headlock, but a shoulder tackle does nothing. Gorilla makes his patented joke about the Terry Garvin AND Pat Patterson School of Self-Defense. Give it a few months, I doubt he’ll ever say it again. Whip reversed, Brawler ducks a clothesline and connects with his own. Sloppy swinging neck breaker for two. Brawler remains in control, driving a pair of shoulders into the midsection. Bully finally takes control, working the Brawler over in the corner. Whip to the corner and Busick misses a knee. They take it to the floor, with Busick regaining control. He dumps the Brawler back in from the apron, but doesn’t make it back in time, and the Brawler is awarded the victory by Count-Out at 4:23. Are you kidding me? You’re DONE when you’re losing matches to the Brawler. DUD


- The Texas Tornado, Greg “The Hammer” Valentine, and “Superfly” Jimmy Snuka vs. The Beverly Brothers (w/ The Genius) and Tanaka – Another exclusive from the October 28th episode of Prime-Time, taped on September 30th from Wheeling, WV. Snuka starts with Beau. Whip to the ropes and Beau with an elbow. He grabs a side headlock and comes off the ropes with a shoulder tackle. Crisscross and Snuka with a big chop. Tornado and Blake are in next. Lockup to the corner and Blake with shoulders to the midsection. Tornado quickly turns it around and pounds away from a mounted position. Blake thinks he outsmarted the Tornado by hanging on to the ropes, but walks into a clothesline anyway. Whip to the corner and Tornado meets the post on a failed charge. Blake with a slam, but misses a flying splash. Valentine in with elbows. Whip and a clothesline, but Beau prevents a cover. Tanaka comes in and quickly finds himself at the mercy of The Hammer. Snuka tags in and finds himself in trouble thanks to a cheap shot from the apron. Beau with a double under-hook suplex for two. Blake with a back breaker for two. Snuka hits a diving headbutt on Tanaka and hot tags the Tornado. He falls all over the place, but manages to hit a Discus Punch for the three count at 7:21. Post-match, the Beverly Brothers take their frustration out on Tanaka, giving him a Beverly Bomb. Basic action. *1/4


Final Thoughts: We’re officially on the road to the Survivor Series, and without an angle in place, we got the announcement of “The Gravest Challenge” being the Main Event of the show. After weeks of Undertaker being at Jake Roberts’ side picking fights with Sid Justice and Randy Savage, including a fresh attack on Sid on Superstars, suddenly he’s targeting Hulk Hogan’s WWF Championship? I’m cool with it, if they had the angle shot first. Roddy Piper and Ric Flair continue to build heat and delay the inevitable matches between Flair and Hogan. The Legion of Doom and Natural Disasters are insta-feuding, and might be the least interesting program over the belts in recent years. Tito Santana made his in-ring return as “El Matador” and it’s just Tito Santana in new tights. There was a mixed collection of stuff featured on Prime-Time Wrestling, mostly average stuff, but a few stinkers (I’m looking at you, Neidhart and Skinner!). Overall, you can see the lack of depth at the top of the card, based on how many important angles are presented regularly.
Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF Battle Royal at The Albert Hall – Taped on October 3rd, 1991 from the Royal Albert Hall in London, England. With the U.S. market on the down-swing, the WWF was making more trips overseas where the product was a hot commodity. The last time the WWF went to the UK, we were tortured with Rampage ’91, so this show has low standards to meet, and should be easy to exceed with just a couple of decent matches. Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are calling the action, and that always makes things better… sometimes.


- The Rockers vs. The Nasty Boys (w/ Jimmy Hart) – Feels like forever since we’ve seen The Rockers, thanks to Michaels missing a good amount of the Summer with an injury. The Rockers clear the ring, and we get an extended bit of stalling, so you know this is going long. Michaels and Sags resume the “action”. Lockup to the corner and Sags with the sucker punch. Michaels ends up cleaning house of both Nasty Boys, and a double clothesline clears the ring, again. Knobbs and Jannetty have a go at it, and it’s more of the same, with Knobbs taking control with his usual limited offensive arsenal. More stalling on the floor. Jannetty with a front face-lock on Sags that transitions into a surfboard. Michaels ends up getting worked over on the floor, and should’ve been counted out multiple times based on how much time is spent out of the ring. Just in case you couldn’t be bored further, we get a long bear-hug spot, followed by the fake hot tag. This is Pro Wrestling 101, where the physicality is limited, but the match is long. Jannetty finally gets the hot tag, running wild with rights and dropkicks. Double Noggin Knocker! The Nasty Boys get sent into each other and Jannetty covers Sags for two. Michaels press slams Marty onto Sags, but in the hoopla, Knobbs comes in with the megaphone, whacks Jannetty with it, and Sags covers for three at 17:21. When they weren’t stalling, the action was OK, but there was no way this needed to go so long. *1/2


- Tito Santana vs. Ric Flair – Even though the vignettes are being shown on syndication, this is plain old Tito Santana, not EL MATADOR Tito Santana. Lockup to start and Flair with a surprisingly clean break. Lockup and Santana with a cheap shot. He grabs a side headlock and sends Flair out of the ring with a shoulder tackle. Back inside, they fight over an over-head wristlock, with Flair taking control with nefarious tactics. He keeps Santana grounded with a hair-pull, working the arm the entire time. Santana comes back with rights and a back drop. He connects with a series of dropkicks, giving Flair a chance to fall on his face. They take it to the floor, with Flair being rammed into everything at ringside. Santana with a sunset flip from the apron for two. He counters a head-lock with a drop toe hold and applies a spinning toe hold. Flair with a roll up for two. Santana with mounted punches, but Flair counters with an inverted atomic drop. He drops a knee across the forehead for two. Whip to the corner and a snap mare for two. Santana rallies, sending Flair to the apron and hitting a clothesline. He brings Flair back in from the apron with a suplex and takes him over with a back slide for two. Flair with a thumb to the eyes, back suplex, and applies the Figure-Four, using the ropes for leverage. Santana counters with the power of Arriba-derci. Flair makes an ill-advised trip to the top rope and gets slammed off. Whip to the corner and a clothesline for two. He connects with the Flying Forearm, but Flair gets a foot on the ropes. Whip to the ropes, and Flair reverses a roll-up with a handful of tights for three at 15:55. Pretty good match despite the positioning on the card. ***1/2


- Big Boss Man vs. Earthquake (w/ Jimmy Hart) – Please God, don’t tell me we’re getting a singles match from Typhoon on the card. It’s our classic battle of the bulge, except the “Big” Boss Man is at his trimmest, maybe a legit 240 pounds. They go back and forth with Earthquake using his massive size advantage, while the Boss Man would try to out-maneuver him and go for a hit-and-run technique. At one point, the Boss Man legit holds onto a side head-lock for more than two minutes. Boss Man comes off the ropes with a series of sledge attacks, knocking Earthquake on his butt like he's King Hippo from “Mike Tyson’s Punch-Out!!”. Boss Man to the top rope, but Quake actually catches him and plants the Boss Man with a power-slam. Quake with more methodical work, including a bear-hug. If that doesn’t tickle your fancy, we get a wonderfully long chin-lock spot, too. Boss Man mounts his comeback, but is quickly crushed in the corner. He mounts another comeback, including an enzuigiri for a near fall. We get heel miscommunication on the apron, but a roll-up only gets two. Mountie makes his way to ringside while Quake gets trapped in the ropes. Mountie ends up tripping the Boss Man while he runs the ropes, and Quake drops an elbow for three at 15:47. It’ll take something special to top this match for worst of the night. DUD


- The Texas Tornado vs. The Mountie (w/ Jimmy Hart) – Oh, my God, I forgot about this match. Well, Earthquake vs. Boss Man WON’T be the worst match after all. Lockup into the corner and Mountie with a clean break. Tornado tries to take a cheap shot, but Mountie counters with a boot to the chest. Tornado retaliates with a Discus Punch, sending the Mountie to the floor. Back inside, Tornado works the arm, then more stalling on the floor. Whip to the corner and Mountie hooks a sleeper. Tornado escapes, but only briefly. We’re approaching the 10-minute mark of the match, and I’ve done detailed PBP. Whip reversed and Tornado with a sleeper. I don’t think I can keep my eyes open, this match is putting me to sleep. Tornado misses a charge to the corner, meeting the post. Tornado takes a big bump over the top rope from a single punch, then takes a header into the steps. Tornado returns the favor, but a Discus Punch meets the post. Back inside, Tornado goes for a snap mare, but Mountie blocks and hooks the legs, with feet on the ropes, for three at 13:18. Strong candidate for Worst Match of 1991, at least from the WWF. -***


- “Hacksaw” Jim Duggan vs. The Undertaker (w/ Paul Bearer) – Probably the only singles meeting between these two, at least on tape (what’s tape?). Undertaker gets a special entrance with the Phantom of the Opera playing him out on an Organ (or Harpsichord, your call). Duggan’s Pro-USA gimmick somehow gets a big face pop. I guess Brits are more forgiving than the Canadians when the crowd sided with Dino Bravo at WrestleMania VI. Taker attacks before the bell, but Duggan quickly controls with rights. He sends Taker over the top rope with a clothesline, with Taker landing on his feet. He makes the mistake of pulling Taker to the apron and gets hung across the top rope for it. Undertaker with choking. He chokes him, and chokes him, then chokes him some more. Taker with the rope-walk clothesline that Duggan barely sells. Duggan comes back with an inverted atomic drop, but it’s no sold. Duggan gives chase to Bearer at ringside, allowing Taker to sneak up and clobber him. Back inside, Taker comes off the ropes with the diving clothesline. Duggan decides enough is enough and grabs the 2x4 for the Disqualification at 6:19. Could’ve been worse, and it was kept short. ½*


- WWF Tag Team Championship Match: The Legion of Doom © vs. Power & Glory – Despite being off TV since SummerSlam, the WWF dusted Paul Roma off for this European Tour. Stalling to start, a trend we’ve seen a lot with this event. Hawk demands a test-of-strength, but Roma balks at the idea. They eventually go through with it, and Hawk controls. Roma with a cheap shot and a series of rights. Whip is reversed and Hawk knocks him out of the ring with a dropkick. Roma tries luring Hawk into a game of cat-and-mouse, but that doesn’t work well. Whip to the ropes and Hawk catches Roma off guard with a hangman’s neck breaker. Snap mare and fist drop for two. Animal and Hercules tag in. Hercules with a clothesline, followed by clubbering. Animal comes back with a clothesline of his own, and now it’s Hercules turn to no-sell. He catches Hawk with an inverted atomic drop. Hawk no-sells on-and-off while he attempts to play face in peril. He no-sells a piledriver from Roma and press slams him on top of Hercules. He goes to the top, but misses a clothesline. Animal eventually gets the hot tag and hits a diving shoulder tackle. Whip to the corner and a clothesline, followed by a dropkick to Hercules. Powerbomb on Roma for two. Heck breaks loose and Animal finishes Roma with a power-slam at 9:08. Not too bad, but the constant no-selling makes it hard to build sympathy for the LOD. *1/2


- The British Bulldog vs. The Barbarian – Main Event anywhere in the country! As long as that country is England. Lord Alfred Hayes does ring introductions for the match. The crowd is hot, but to be honest, they’ve been hot all night. Bulldog works the arm to start. Whip to the ropes and Barbarian with a big boot to knock the Bulldog out of the ring. Barbarian follows, ramming him into the post. Back inside, Barbarian with a snap mare into a chin-lock. Bulldog teases a comeback, but Barbarian plants him with a piledriver for a near fall. Barbarian with a slam, but the flying elbow drop misses. Bulldog with rights and a clothesline, sending Barbarian to the floor. Back inside, Bulldog with a clothesline for two. Delayed vertical suplex for two. Whip across the ring is reversed and Barbarian misses a charge. Bulldog recovers and plants him with the running power-slam at 10:07. Not much to see here, but at least it didn’t go 20-minutes. ¼*


- 20-Man Battle Royal (Participants: Roddy Piper, The Texas Tornado, The British Bulldog, Tito Santana, Big Boss Man, Jim Duggan, Hawk, Animal, Shawn Michaels, Marty Jannetty, Ric Flair, The Undertaker, The Barbarian, The Mountie, Earthquake, Typhoon, Paul Roma, Hercules, Brian Knobbs, Jerry Sags) Final match on the card. Everyone, sans Typhoon and Piper, are working double duty. Piper goes right after Flair, chasing him in and out of the ring. Boss Man and Mountie rekindle their rivalry, too. Hawk dumps out Hercules at 2:29, and Tornado is gone next at 2:40, courtesy Nasty Boy Knobbs. Piper tosses Knobbs to the apron and nudges him off with two fingers at 3:24. Typhoon tosses Jannetty at 3:39. Santana eliminates The Barbarian at 4:15, then Earthquake dumps Santana at 4:39. More brawling between Piper and Flair. Sags tosses Hawk at 5:13, Animal throws out Sags at 5:18, and Mountie dumps Shawn Michaels at 5:49. Earthquake throws out Duggan at 6:38. He comes back with the 2x4 and nails Quake, allowing Animal to send him over the top at 7:09. Piper and Flair continue to brawl outside the ring. Back in, and Piper back drops Flair out at 7:44. Bulldog dumps Roma at 8:56. Undertaker eliminates Animal at 9:06. Piper ducks a clothesline and eliminates Taker at 9:31. He’s a sore loser about it and pulls Piper out at 9:36 like Bad News at the 1990 Royal Rumble.

Final Four is The British Bulldog, Big Boss Man, The Mountie, and Typhoon. Who is possibly winning this match? Boss Man works over the Mountie, but misses a charge, and goes flying out at 11:24. Bulldog gets double teamed, but manages to produce some heel miscommunication. The 2-on-1 continues to hamper him, but don’t worry, they mess up again, and Typhoon accidentally clotheslines Mountie out at 13:37. Bulldog with a series of shoulder tackles and a dropkick. Whip to the corner and Typhoon crushes him with an avalanche. He charges again, but Bulldog back drops him out for the victory at 14:40. Post-match, Earthquake comes out to tease a beatdown, but ANDRE THE GIANT shows up to even the odds. How nice of him. Other than the stuff with Piper and Flair, this was your typical nothing Battle Royal. NR


Final Thoughts: We got one good match and a whole lot of “stuff” happening. I’m sure the WWF starved European audience enjoyed it, but watching 15+ minute matches of guys who have no business exceeding 5 sometimes is something I wouldn’t consider entertaining. Flair vs. Santana isn’t good enough to make up for the other 2 ½ hours of boredom, so if you come across this one, don’t waste your time unless you need to put yourself to sleep.
Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF @ Barcelona, Spain – October 5th, 1991 – The European Tour continues with a stop at the Palau Sant Jordi in Barcelona. This is a cobbled together show from various sources, including the original broadcast on Tele5, on the Italian version of Superstars, and multiple releases from Coliseum Video. The only match not featured was Typhoon defeating “Hacksaw” Jim Duggan by Disqualification with the obvious finish.


- The Rockers vs. Power & Glory – At least they reshuffled the card from what we were presented in London, giving us a fresh lineup. We waste a couple of minutes before any contact is made. Please God, not a bunch of long matches where half of that is standing around. Jannetty and Roma start. Roma pounds away in the corner. Whip to the ropes and a distraction from Michaels allows Jannetty to connect with a super-kick. Double Super-Kick to Hercules to clear the ring. Michaels skins the cat and comes off the ropes with a body press for two. Hercules gets to become familiar with the top turnbuckle and Michaels follows it up with mounted punches. Marty avoids a boot in the corner and straddles Hercules on the post. Roma gives chase and walks into a clothesline. Roma gets his revenge, fish hooking Jannetty from the apron to turn the tide in his team’s favor. Roma with a sledge from the top rope, followed by a series of back breakers for two. Whip to the ropes and a phantom clothesline still turns Jannetty inside-out. Hercules and Roma take turns beating the piss out of him. Hercules with a big clothesline for two. Roma misses a charge to the corner, allowing Michaels to get the hot tag. He hits both opponents with Super-Kicks, followed by a double noggin knocker. Jannetty with a slingshot double clothesline. Hercules loads up with his chain, but accidentally KO’s Roma, and Michaels cradles him for three at 13:07. Decent match, but nothing to go crazy for. This marks Paul Roma’s last appearance for WWE, for those keeping track. **


- Big Boss Man vs. The Mountie (w/ Jimmy Hart) – The Mountie is without direction, while Boss Man transitioned into a feud with I.R.S. that went nowhere. Mountie attacks, but gets caught in a leap frog and planted with a spine-buster. Boss Man gives chase to Hart before returning to the ring and stomping on Mountie’s fingers. He slaps Mountie around and even threatens Danny Davis. Boss Man with choking across the middle rope, followed by a seated splash across the back. He makes a trip to the top rope and hangs himself across the top rope. After nearly 5-minutes of getting squashed, the Mountie is finally on offense, driving an elbow across the chest, knocking Boss Man to the arena floor. Whip and he connects with a diving elbow. Mountie takes a break to remind the audience of who he is. Boss Man teases a comeback, splashing Mountie and pounding away with rights. He connects with a running power-slam and the Boss Man Slam, but Hart hops on the apron for a distraction. Boss Man gives chase and gets Counted-Out at 9:19. SERIOUSLY? Boss Man on offense was fine, Mountie not so much. I’m convinced it’s impossible to get a good match out of Jacques Rougeau at this point. *


- “Rowdy” Roddy Piper vs. The Barbarian – Recycled on the “World Tour ‘92” Coliseum Video. They go nose-to-nose. Lockup to the corner and referee Joey Marella does his best to physically separate them. They exchange shoves, with Barbarian noticeably frustrated. Piper tries to give a clean break in the ropes, but a cheap shot infuriates him, again. Piper with a side headlock, but a shoulder tackle has no effect. They do a test-of-strength, easily won by the Barbarian. Piper with a unique rolling counter and a back drop, sending Barbarian to the arena floor. Barbarian takes control with clubbering blows. He connects with a back breaker for two, then slaps on a bear-hug. Piper escapes with an ear smack, but jumps into another bear-hug. Whip to the ropes and Piper with a surprise inside cradle for two. He counters a slam with another cradle for two. Barbarian with a clothesline, sending Piper through the ropes for a comical bump. Piper with a sunset flip, and you know the rest at 10:21. I didn’t expect much, and they delivered on those expectations. ½*


- The British Bulldog (w/ Andre The Giant) vs. Earthquake (w/ Jimmy Hart) – Another match recycled from the “World Tour ‘92” Coliseum Video. Davey Boy has “Winston” with him, too, despite having disappeared for months. Earthquake teases going after Andre, but Andre backs him off with his crutch. Bulldog wins the popular vote in their unofficial posing contest. Lockup and Quake with a shove to the corner. Bulldog with a pair of dropkicks, sending Earthquake to the floor. Quake catches him coming off the second rope and slaps on a bear-hug. Bulldog tries to counter with a slam, but Quake falls on top for a near fall. Whip and a sunset flip also goes unsuccessfully. Did Lord Alfred just claim nobody has ever slammed Earthquake?! More bear-hug fun. Quake with a power-slam, but instead of going for the finish, he sets his attention on Andre. The referee actually stops Andre from using the crutch, allowing Earthquake to kick his knee. Quake manages to botch stepping on and over the Bulldog. Andre recovers, whacks Earthquake with the crutch, and Bulldog finishes with a slam at 8:16. Another nothing match, and sadly, the last we’ll see of Andre the Giant on WWF programming. ½*


- WWF Tag Team Championship Match: The Legion of Doom © vs. The Nasty Boys (w/ Jimmy Hart) – I’m becoming a broken record, but please keep it a reasonable length. This may come as a surprise, but we start with a bit of stalling. Based on the Italian commentary, this wasn’t televised in that country until around WrestleMania VIII. Animal shoves both Nasty Boys around. Hawk with a double noggin knocker and bulldog, and Animal sends both out of the ring with a double clothesline. Sags attacks from behind, but Animal quickly recovers and bulldozes both with shoulder tackles. Hart gets involved, allowing Knobbs to weakly whack Animal with the megaphone. To the floor, and Animal gets thrown into the steps with little force. Animal counters a neck breaker with one of his own, but Knobbs cuts off the hot tag. Knobbs with choking in the corner while Sags keeps the referee occupied. Animal fights out of a seated chin-lock, slamming down across Knobbs with the weight of his entire body. Whip and Animal with a power-slam for two. Double clothesline to the Nasties and hot tag to Hawk. He runs wild with rights and the most half-assed jumping shoulder tackle I’d ever seen. Sags tries to give Animal a piledriver, but Hawk comes off the top with a clothesline to finish at 11:40. Another poor match, with snug work and Hawk looking like he’d rather be anywhere else. ¼*


- The Texas Tornado vs. Ric Flair – Recycled on one of the budget “World Tour” Coliseum Videos, and the only one-on-one meeting of Flair and Von Erich in WWE (they would briefly cross paths in the ’92 Rumble Match). Lockup and Tornado shoved Flair across the ring. Flair quickly turns a test of strength into a wristlock. Tornado counters, pounding away on the arm. Tornado counters aside headlock with an over-head wrist-lock and transitions into the arm-bar. Flair tosses Tornado out of the ring. He tries to take Flair over with a sunset flip, but gets a fist between the eyes. Flair with a snap mare and knee drop across the forehead for two. Tornado rolls away from a second knee drop and slaps on the Figure-Four in the center of the ring. Flair manages to get to the ropes, forcing a break. Tornado backs him into the corner and unloads with mounted punches. Whip to the corner, and a clothesline sends Flair rolling to the apron. He brings Flair back in with a suplex for two. Flair with a casual thumb to the eyes. They trade blows in the corner, with Tornado getting the better of the exchange. Whip across the ring, and this time Tornado misses a charge, meeting the post. Flair pulls him to the floor and introduces him to the security rail. Flair with a pair of snap mares across the top rope. Back inside, and he puts the boots to the Tornado. Snap mare into a cover, but the referee sees the feet on the ropes.

Tornado rallies with rights. Whip to the corner, Flair flips to the apron, climbs the ropes, and jumps into the Von Erich Claw. Flair counters with a back suplex and does a flop for the heck of it. Tornado with a side headlock and shoulder tackle. Crisscross and Flair hooks a sleeper. Tornado escapes with elbows to the midsection and comes off the ropes with a shoulder tackle. Whip and Tornado counters a hip toss with a back slide for a near fall. He no-sells the chop in the corner and backs Flair into the opposite corner. He unloads with more rights and sends Flair flying with a hip throw. Flair leads him in a game of cat-and-mouse, but ends up tasting the guard rail himself. Flair thumbs the eyes again and Tornado comes right back with a clothesline. Flair to the top rope for a second time, and this time he gets slammed down. Tornado with the Discus Punch, but Flair gets a foot on the ropes at two. Tornado sends Flair over the top with a clothesline. Flair with a shoulder to the midsection and splashes down on Tornado, with feet on the ropes, for three at 15:18. Yes, this was the same Kerry Von Erich we saw looking lost and hopeless two days prior against The Mountie. This far exceeded expectations, as Flair did his usual formula and plugged the Tornado in and it didn’t seem to miss a beat. ***1/2


- Tito Santana vs. The Undertaker (w/ Paul Bearer) – Interesting Main Event. I guess Santana is the closest they had to a representative for the country of Spain, and he’s not even doing the “El Matador” gimmick. Santana avoids a sneak attack and unloads with rights. He woks the arm, with varying levels of facial expression from Taker to try and sell it. Santana’s sunset flip attempt fails, so it’s back to working the arm. Undertaker meets a boot in the corner and Santana comes off the middle rope with a clothesline. Santana with another clothesline, sending the dead man over the top rope. Taker catches Santana with a hangman across the top rope to take control. Taker with the rope walk clothesline in between slow-motion stalking. Santana tries going for a slam, but Undertaker blocks. Taker with a slam, but he misses an elbow drop. He tries the rope walk a second time, but Santana counters by yanking him down. Santana with a series of rights and boots to the midsection. He hits the Flying Forearm, but it only rocks the Undertaker. He hits it a second time, with the same result. One more attempt, and this time Undertaker pulls the referee in the way. He comes from behind and gives Santana the 1991 version of a curb stomp, followed by a side slam. He takes the immoral victory of stuffing Santana in a body bag, but with the power of Ariba-derci, Santana fights free of his plastic prison. Santana with a piledriver. Taker sits up. Santana with a second piledriver. Again, Undertaker sits up. THIRD PILEDRIVER, and this time he doesn’t sit up. Santana wrestles the urn away from Paul Bearer, whacks Undertaker with it, and covers for three at 13:54. That might be the most over-booked WWF match of 1991, but considered tame by today’s standards. Standard Undertaker match for the time, but with an over the top finish to send the fans home happy. *1/2


Final Thoughts: A slightly better show than what London got on October 3rd, but there’s still a good amount of low quality stuff to sit through. Based on quality, I can only recommend checking out Flair and Texas Tornado. Undertaker vs. Santana is worth checking out for curiosity sake, and the rest is just not worth bothering with. Andre the Giant makes his last WWF appearance, but it’s as a corner man in a poor match between Earthquake and Davey Boy Smith. Overall, a thumbs down card, but the hot crowd makes it somewhat more watchable.
Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Erick Von Erich
Member Avatar
I'm Big E and I tell it like it is
[ *  *  * ]
Tito vs the "undefeated" Undertaker is just bizarre. Weird how the foreign tour matches were usually set in their own alternate universe.

Kerry vs. Flair still makes me happy.
<!---Hit Paydirt with K-Dirt--->
DWS Apparel Store- Buy. Consume. Obey.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
HeenanandMonsoon
Member Avatar
dWb Superstar
[ *  *  * ]
I believe that Flair/Kerry match is on a CHV. I wanna say World Tour.
Founder of the Humanoid Nation Community on PSN

Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF @ Sacramento, CA – October 24th, 1991 – Fan-Cam Footage from the Arco Arena. Only the second half of the card is presented, and for anyone curious as to what filled out the rest of the show, here’s Dave Meltzer’s personal opinions from the November 4th issue of the Wrestling Observer Newsletter…


“1. British Bulldog pinned Col. Mustafa with a sunset flip in 11:45. Bulldog mainly led cheers, flexed and otherwise stalled as to keep in tact his record of never elevating his heart rate or sweating during a match. Fans were chanting "USA, USA" during this match. Well, USA used to be a part of the United Kingdom, but that ended around 1776. Anyway, I asked a six-year-old behind me why he was chanting "USA, USA" (believe me, anything was more entertaining than watching this match). He said, "I don't know." Later he figured out and told me, "I'm for the American, aren't you?" I told him I'd make him a deal, if he can find an American, I'd be for him also. Finally he gave up finding me one and said he was chanting it "because I want to." This was brutally horrible. Little did we know it was only the beginning. -*3/4

2. The Mountie beat Bret Hart via count out in 13:28 so Bret kept the Intercontinental title. Nothing happened at all during this match. They were on the floor and Mountie held Bret for Jimmy Hart to hit him with the megaphone but Bret moved and Mountie got the shot. But Mountie got the zapper and zapped Bret and he was about to hit Jimmy Hart and got back in the ring to beat the count. 1/4*

3. Greg "Human Intermission" Valentine beat Hercules in 12:51 with the figure four leglock. Words can't describe this other than it being the single worst match I've seen this year. The highlight was Valentine doing three straight Dusty clotheslines. The lowlight was the rest of it. -****”



- I guess we can’t complain about missing any of that. I heard the intermission got a **1/2, making it one of the best parts of the show.


- WWF Tag Team Championship Match: The Legion of Doom © vs. The Natural Disasters (w/ Jimmy Hart) – I have little expectations for this one. I can’t stress enough that the whole appeal of the LOD was them mauling people, and now they’re presented as the undersized underdogs. WWE ruins everything™. Hawk and Typhoon start with lockups that go nowhere. Typhoon with a clothesline and bear-hug. I’m already bored enough to try and spot Dave Meltzer in the crowd. Hawk gets a boot up in the corner and comes off the ropes with a flying shoulder tackle. Animal and Earthquake have their go at things now. Animal gets the better of a slugfest and drops Quake with a diving shoulder tackle. He goes for a slam, but Quake falls on top for two. Belly-to-belly suplex for another two-count. Animal rolls away from an elbow, but a cheap shot from Typhoon allows Quake to knock him out of the ring with a clothesline. Back inside, Quake slaps on a bear-hug. Animal fights to the corner, but the referee misses the tag. Quake with a power-slam for two. Animal with a boot to the face and a clothesline before the hot tag to Hawk. He runs wild on Earthquake with a dropkick and shoulder tackle. Heck breaks loose, with Animal double-teamed. They hit their combo finisher and toss the referee for the Disqualification at 8:13. That makes sense. Post-match, Hawk clears the ring with a flying double clothesline. Not as bad as I expected, but not very good. *1/4


- Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart vs. The Berzerker – Who booked this card? Was the roster really this thin?! The answer is “yes”. Lockup and Berzerker with a premature celebration. Neidhart with forearms to the chest. Berzerker grabs a side headlock, but a shoulder tackle does nothing. Crisscross and Neidhart with a hip toss. Whip to the ropes and Berzerker with a boot, followed by choking across the top rope. They take it to the floor, where Berzerker uses a chair in clear view of the referee. Back inside, Neidhart keeps trying to mount rallies, but Berzerker won’t sell long enough for it to pick up momentum. Berzerker with an elbow, but he misses a leg drop. He can’t even bother to trap Neidhart in the ropes properly. He ends up getting straddled across the top rope and shaken around. Neidhart kicks the leg from under him and connects with a clothesline. Whip and a forearm smash for two. Neidhart’s monkey flip attempt is blocked and Berzerker used the ropes to cradle him for three at 7:37. Bad match, but reasonably short. DUD


- Big Boss Man vs. Irwin R. Schyster – There’s no way this can be worse than the last match, even at Irwin’s most boring levels. Irwin hides out on the floor before the bell. He attacks Boss Man while he toys around with the referee. They do a surprisingly quick, extended sequence in the corner with the Boss Man eventually clearing Irwin from the ring. Back inside, Boss Man continues to showcase his improved speed and agility. Either this crowd really loves the Boss Man or really hates I.R.S. Boss Man’s dive into the corner meets nothing but the ropes and turnbuckle pad. Irwin follows him to the floor and sends him to the steps. Back inside for the infamous abdominal stretch spot. Boss Man counters with a hip toss and cradles Irwin for two. I.R.S. regains control and drops a pair of elbows for two. Things slow down with an extended chin-lock. Boss Man rallies and connects with a splash. He sends Irwin from one corner to the other, but misses a dive from the top rope, and Irwin cradles him for three at 8:00… but wait, the referee decides that he saw the feet on the ropes, and Boss Man school boys him for the true three-count at 8:15. Post-match, Irwin attacks with the briefcase. Decent action minus the long chin-lock. **1/2


- “Rowdy” Roddy Piper vs. Ric Flair – Main Event of the evening. I’m surprised there wasn’t a pre-match attack. Lockup to the corner and a clean break from Flair, followed by a “woo.” Lockup #2, Flair with a shove and Piper responds with a slap. They do a chain wrestling spot, ending with another slap from Hotrod. They play a game of cat-and-mouse, but the referee forces it back into the ring. More chain-wrestling and a third slap. Flair with a chop and uppercut in the corner. Piper quickly comes back with a flurry of rights and lefts, leading to our first Flair flop of the match. To the outside again, and this time Piper sends Flair into the post. The referee decides to block Piper’s punch, opening the door for Flair to get a cheap shot to swing the momentum in his favor.

Flair with a snap mare out of the corner, followed by his signature knee drop for two. Inverted atomic drop for another two-count. They do a series of counters, leading into a bridge and back slide from Piper for two. Flair quickly goes to the eyes and tosses Piper to the floor. Piper pops back up, only to get tossed out on the opposite side of the ring. Piper counters a suplex with a rolling cradle for two. Piper decides to no-sell Flair’s strikes. Whip and Piper with a clothesline. He traps Flair in the corner and pounds away from a mounted position before giving him a casual stooge eye-poke. He sets up for a running bulldog, but Flair shoves him into the referee. Piper with a small package, but the referee is still down. He counters a hip toss with a back slide, and still no referee. Flair grabs a chair and hits the most pathetic chair shot I’ve ever seen. The referee wakes up, no-selling a second referee’s attempt to enter the match, but it only gets a two count. Whip and Piper with a sleeper, but Flair quickly counters with a back suplex. Flair goes to the top, and we all know where this goes. Whip to the corner, Flair ends up on the apron, and runs into a clothesline. Piper with a swinging neck breaker. He grabs a chair, but the referee prevents him from using it. Flair with a sucker punch and splash, with feet on the ropes, for three at 11:41. Post-match, Piper bops the referee with the chair and gives Flair an equally weak whack with it. Even with the cheap finish, it’s a shock to see Piper do a pin-fall job under any circumstances. Good match, although a bit short on time. ***1/4


Final Thoughts: Of the matches featured, only one stood out as something that is avoidable content. Thankfully we didn’t have to sit through the rest of the undercard. Flair/Piper is a solid main event, Boss Man/IRS over-delivered, and LOD/Natural Disasters could’ve been worse, I guess.
Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
WWF @ Madison Square Garden – October 28th, 1991 – Our fourth house show in the month of October, and at least we’re closing it out at the world’s most famous arena. Gorilla Monsoon, Bobby “The Brain” Heenan and Lord Alfred Hayes are calling the action, unless otherwise noted. This show is available on the WWE Network, for those wondering, and yes, that’s the version I’m watching for this recap. It looks like the same crew that worked in Sacramento, but with the undercard switched around.


- The Texas Tornado vs. Big Bully Busick – I don’t know what smart-ass remark to make. Topping the list of options are “who booked this to open the show” and “wow, this is going to be ugly.” No Wippleman at ringside for this one. Lockup and Tornado gives a clean break. Busick surprisingly gives a clean break, but Tornado refuses to accept the handshake. Tornado with a side headlock, followed by a shoulder tackle. Whip to the corner and a hip toss. Busick with boots to the midsection to control a test-of-strength. The PBP team gives the referee a hard time for his poor work (“maybe he went to the Helen Keller school of refereeing”). Tornado rallies, but ends up smacking his shoulder on the post. Tornado catches him coming off the turnbuckle with the Claw. Busick blocks the discus punch and counters with a right hand. Whip to the corner and Busick with a clothesline. Tornado fights out of a sleeper, gets a boot up in the corner, and hits the Discus Punch for three at 7:51. Gorilla called the move a “Whirling Dervish” 25 years before the Vaudevillains were a thing. Basic action. *


- The British Bulldog vs. Irwin R. Schyster – Based on rivalries, you might say I.R.S. is the favorite to go over. Lockup and Irwin with a slam, followed by a hip toss. We run down the 4-on-4 match captained by Flair and Piper. Monsoon with a great line “Warlord only cares about Domino’s Pizza” trying to bury the lack of teamwork we’ll see from Flair’s team. Bulldog gives I.R.S. the same treatment and sends him out of the ring with a clothesline. Back inside, Bulldog works the arm. Crisscross and I.R.S. bails. Another crisscross, and Irwin gets sent back out with a dropkick after doing the “I’m smarter than him, so I’ll point to my head” spot. I.R.S. counters a headlock with a back suplex, but misses an elbow. Irwin uses Bulldog’s momentum to throw him out of the ring. Back inside, and Irwin with his patented abdominal stretch. Irwin with a leg drop for two. Bulldog with a body press for two. Bulldog escapes a chin-lock, but runs into a knee. Whip and Irwin with a back drop. Another escape, and this time I.R.S. takes his head off with a diving clothesline. Bulldog ducks another clothesline, sending Irwin flying over the top rope. Bulldog with a back drop for two. Irwin sneaks a spare tag rope into his pocket as they chew the clock. Irwin counters the suplex with a deliberately choke with the rope. Bulldog gets his own rope and gives Irwin a receipt. Bulldog with a cradle, but the bell rings at 20:04 for the time limit draw. You can tell they were pacing for 20. Match was fine, all things considered. **1/2


- Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart vs. The Mountie (w/ Jimmy Hart) – I don’t think I’ll miss having to recap matches with Neidhart once he’s sent packing. Neidhart calls Mountie a jailbird, referencing Mountie’s unfortunate fate the last time they were in MSG. Mountie quickly attempts a slam, but can’t budge the Anvil. Neidhart slams him with ease (three times), sending him to the floor for another breather. Heenan and Monsoon discuss MC Hammer, with the obvious comedy of Monsoon unfamiliar with him. I can honestly say the Mountie is in my Top 5 of “people I don’t look forward to watching” as of October ’91. Neidhart with a hip toss and clotheslines. I seriously don’t know where they’re going with this. Hart with a distraction, allowing Mountie to attack from behind. Whip and Mountie with a diving elbow. Mountie with choking. Crisscross and Neidhart with a face-buster. Whip and a fist to the midsection, followed by a clothesline for two. Neidhart misses a knee in the corner, and Mountie rolls him up for three at 11:25. The commentary was great, the match was crap. DUD


- “Rowdy” Roddy Piper vs. Ric Flair (w/ Bobby Heenan) – Main Event in the middle of the show? Great, time for marks and uneducated fools to claim whatever closes this show is the “real” Main Event. Lockup to the corner and a clean break (Woo!). Piper spits at Flair in response to his “Woo.” Flair with a shove and Piper with a slap. They do a chain wrestling spot, ending with another slap. Piper with a side headlock and a shoulder tackle. Flair with a knee to the midsection and chops in the corner. Piper fights back with a flurry of strikes, giving Flair the chance to do his signature flop. Piper follows him to the floor, sending him into the guardrail. Crisscross and Piper with another right hand. Hebner gets in the way of things, allowing Flair to drive a knee into the midsection. Flair with a side headlock. Piper bridges up and takes him over with a back slide for two. Flair tries tossing Piper out of the ring, but he keeps popping up. Piper with more strikes, a whip to the corner, and back drop. He connects with a running knee lift and sends Flair over the top rope with a clothesline. Back inside, Piper with mounted corner punches. He sets up for the running bulldog, but ends up taking out the referee. Small package, but nobody to count. Danny Davis comes in to count two. Whip to the corner, Flair ends up on the apron and gets wiped out with a clothesline. Flair brings a chair in and bops Piper with it behind the back of both referees, but it only gets two. Piper reverses a whip and hooks a sleeper, but Flair quickly counters with a back suplex. Flair to the top, but Piper pops up to slam him down. Piper no-sells the chops and beats on him some more. Piper with a swinging neck breaker. He steals Lord Alfred’s chair, but the referee stops him from using it. Flair with a cheap shot from the apron. He splashes Piper and gets the three-count with his feet on the ropes at 12:01. Same structure as the match in Sacramento. ***


- Big Boss Man vs. Col. Mustafa – Hopefully it’s short. No Adnan at ringside. Must be budget cutting time with the lack of second-string managers. I.R.S. makes his way to ringside to instruct the referee that the Boss Man is a tax cheat and he shouldn’t be allowed to wrestle. Mustafa attacks from behind with his usual garbage strikes. Boss Man comes back with a pair of clotheslines and gives chase to Irwin, but he’s already out of site. Boss Man with a questionably low knee and mounted corner punches. Is Mustafa a closet Hulkamaniac, wearing the yellow wristbands? He takes Boss Man over with a gut-wrench suplex. Boss Man blocks a suplex and counters with his own. Boss Man with a headbutt, and the spine-buster finishes at 4:52. Thank you. Match was still bad, though. DUD


- WWF Intercontinental Championship Match: Bret “Hitman” Hart © vs. The Berzerker – We have seen Berzerker pin people before, so challenging for a title is no longer as ridiculous as it used to be. Berzerker attacks before the bell and chokes away in the corner. Bret rolls away from a knee drop and pounds away. He connects with a pair of dropkicks, sending Berzerker out of the ring. Back inside, and a hip toss and clothesline sends him back out. Bret with two atomic drops with the same end game. Whip to the corner and Bret meets a boot charging in. To the floor, Berzerker chokes with an electrical cord. Berzerker with a slam, but he misses a flying leg drop. Bret with a shoulder to the midsection, but he runs into a knee lift. Berzerker with a piledriver for a near fall. Berzerker catches a body press and counters with a power-slam for two. Berzerker misses a running shoulder tackle and gets straddled across the top rope. Bret with a Russian leg sweep for two. Small package for two. Back breaker and second rope elbow for two. Berzerker blocks the Sharpshooter, but a crucifix cradle is enough for Bret to retain at 11:18. Surprisingly watchable (yes, I think Berzerker is bad enough to be a guaranteed bad match). **


- “El Matador” Tito Santana vs. Hercules – The “MSG Debut” of El Matador. Hercules seems less than impressed with Santana’s cape. Santana baits him into charging, and the gimmick dies as soon as the cape is put away. They get into a shoving match, then trade rights. Whip and Hercules bails. Back inside, Hercules with a side headlock. Santana does some side-stepping to avoid the shoulder tackle and traps him in an arm-bar. Santana with mounted corner punches for two. Hercules with an inverted atomic drop to take control. Hercules pounds away and sends Santana to the corner. He slaps on a bear-hug to slow things down. Santana fights free, but gets laid out with a clothesline. Santana escapes another bear-hug with an inverted atomic drop. Whip reversal and Santana with the Flying Forearm, but Hercules gets a boot on the bottom rope. Santana counters a piledriver and finishes with the Paso del Muerte at 9:12. The crowd did NOT enjoy this one, and I can see why. ¼*


- WWF Tag Team Championship Match: The Legion of Doom © vs. The Natural Disasters (w/ Jimmy Hart) – Final match of the evening. All four men stand toe-to-toe, leading into a shoving contest. Hawk and Typhoon start with a stalemate lockup. Clotheslines do nothing. Earthquake with a distraction, allowing Typhoon to hit Hawk from behind and grab a bear-hug. Hawk with a boot in the corner, followed by a flying forearm for two. Animal and Earthquake have a go at it. Animal with a diving shoulder tackle for two. He goes for a slam, but Quake lands on top for two. Quake with a belly-to-belly suplex for two. Typhoon with a cheap shot from the apron. Quake with a bear-hug. Typhoon tags in to pick up where he left off. Hawk’s hot tag goes unnoticed. Quake with a casual power-slam for two. Animal with a boot and a clothesline to take Quake down. Hawk gets the hot tag for real and runs wild with rights and a dropkick. Everyone brawls. Hawk gets taken out. Typhoon with a slam and splash to Animal, and Quake hits the Vertical Splash. Typhoon tosses the referee for the Disqualification at 8:03. Post-match, Hawk comes back to life to help clear the ring. Again, who booked such a dumb finish? Move for move the same as their match from Sacramento. *


Final Thoughts: Nothing to say too positive or negative about this show. A decent main event and a few undercard surprises makes it an easier show to sit through, but nothing is that good. On the flip side of the coin, nothing is too bad, either, or at least nothing too bad that doesn’t get much more than 10-minutes.
Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Scrooge McSuck
I'll get you next time, toilet!
[ *  *  * ]
Random News and Tidbits…


- One of the big headlines in the month of October is the sudden departure of Ricky Steamboat. I apologize now for how longwinded this one will be. There’s no short version for this one, so here we go: Steamboat arrived at the TV taping on October 21st in Ft. Wayne, IN and gave his notice, frustrated with the lack of push he was receiving and a payout that was below what he was promised. The plan moving forward was to put over Ted Dibiase in a short house show program, and doing jobs for the Undertaker and I.R.S., meant for television. Steamboat refused to do the jobs, wanting to protect his name and value, and somewhere in the story, there was even an alleged push to have him do not one, but TWO stretcher jobs at the same taping (Personally, I call bullshit on this. For as much crap Vince McMahon deserves, he’d never OK such a business exposing move, and you can’t say someone did it to make him quit when he was already quitting to begin with). This went from Steamboat giving notice to being fired for refusing to do what was traditionally expected of anyone on their way out.

I’m not trying to dog Steamboat… OK, maybe I am a little, but how he survived fan backlash over the years is astonishing. Yes, he could be a great wrestler, but he could also be as lazy as Bret Hart or Shawn Michaels, two names often brought up for polar abilities, depending on the day of the week. Steamboat’s behavior is hardly surprising. The famous story of asking for time off after WrestleMania III is well documented, and again, he gets a free pass. He’s given the secondary title and expected to headline the B-Tours, but now he needs a couple of months off? OK, fine. He comes back later that year and just floats around, then abruptly quits immediately after WrestleMania IV because of his lack of direction. He moves on to the NWA and headlines with Ric Flair, but when he’s expected to take a pay-cut with disappointing gates (5-star matches doesn’t equal money at the box office), he decides to leave again, with little notice. Then you have fans trash the “Dragon” fire-breathing gimmick, yet he brought the same gimmick to WCW, and somehow nobody ever complained about that? The fact the WWF didn’t send a cease and desist for doing the gimmick they came up with is astonishing. Anyway, Steamboat did his share of bullshit moves and should be called out for it like anyone else, end of story.


- The WWF has added a Pay-Per-View for Tuesday Night, December 6th in San Antonio, less than a week following the Survivor Series. The price is set at $12.95, approximately half the price-tag of Survivor Series, and is slotted to run no longer than 2-hours.


- Hulk Hogan’s name continues to be dragged through the mud, with it revealed that he received at least 5 packages at his home from Dr. Zahorian, either signed by himself or his wife, using various aliases. He spent a good amount of time off the road throughout the fall doing P.R. work to enhance his credibility, but his reactions have suffered at live events.


- Sid Justice tore his left bicep and will miss at least two months of action. This hampers one of the key matches at Survivor Series, and now more than ever the WWF desperately needs Randy Savage to return to a full-time schedule, with Sid injured and the Warrior “suspended.”


- Owen Hart is rumored to return, forming the Hart Foundation with Jim Neidhart.


- With half the roster in Europe the first week of October, let’s see what was featured at the Nassau Coliseum on October 5th… Bret Hart pinned The Warlord to retain the Intercontinental Title… Ted Dibiase defeated Virgil (Million $ Champion) by Count-Out…Sid Justice defeated Jake Roberts by Disqualification… I.R.S. pinned Jim Neidhart… The Berzerker pinned Greg Valentine… The Dragon pinned Skinner… The Beverly Brothers defeated The Bushwhackers… Jimmy Snuka pinned Bob Bradley (Subbing for Tanaka). I think we can assume not one match topped 2-stars.


- Chris Chavis received yet another tryout on October 21st against Skinner. Yeah, that’s someone to work with to get noticed. Also featured at the taping is a match between The Undertaker and Big Boss Man. Maybe Unreleased DVD Vol. 2?


Jeez, not much to say this month, huh?
Posted Image
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Erick Von Erich
Member Avatar
I'm Big E and I tell it like it is
[ *  *  * ]
Thus endeth the official WWF tenure of Steamboat's career (you can't really count that comeback, circa 2009). Said it before and it bears repeating: he's probably the most intriguing, yet frustrating wrestler of the era. As a fan, I probably gave up on him around this time; feeling he wasn't worth the headache.

From a fan's standpoint, he's very easy to get into. Cool look, cool name and usually a pretty good in-ring wrestler. Which are probably what gets him a free pass from smarks. You could make a case that he was the best North American wrestler from 1983 to 1989. Yet his off-stage antics prove that he was just as moody as others (if not more so). I always thought that he felt more comfortable in JCP/WCW, but he messed with them just as much as he messed with the WWF.
<!---Hit Paydirt with K-Dirt--->
DWS Apparel Store- Buy. Consume. Obey.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
DealsFor.me - The best sales, coupons, and discounts for you
« Previous Topic · Reviews and Columns · Next Topic »
Add Reply